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Videos uploaded by user “Mathematical Association of America”
Magical Squaring
 
12:08
Mathemagician Art Benjamin demonstrates and explains the mathematics underlying a mental arithmetic technique for quickly squaring numbers.
Arthur Benjamin on "Becoming Mathemagician"
 
04:44
Art Benjamin (Harvey Mudd College) describes a childhood experience in which he discovered a trick for mentally calculating squares, leading him to a career that combines mathematics and magic.
A Surreptitious Sequence: The Catalan Numbers
 
10:23
Alissa S. Crans, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Loyola Marymount University, introduces viewers to the Catalan numbers, which take on a variety of different guises as they provide the solution to numerous problems throughout mathematics. Crans delivered a Distinguished Lecture on May 21, 2014: http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-events/a-surreptitious-sequence-the-catalan-numbers
John H. Conway - Doomsday, part 1
 
04:12
This video features John Horton Conway, and was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Interview by Bruce and Eve Torrence, filmed March 20, 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
Does 0.99999.. equal one or does it not?
 
05:30
James Tanton answers questions sent in by students who participated in our Google Connected Classroom (http://bit.ly/1pvTaia). Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
"Visualizing Hyperbolic Geometry", Evelyn Lamb
 
10:47
Dr. Evelyn Lamb is a freelance math and science writer based in Salt Lake City. She earned her Ph.D. in mathematics at Rice University in 2012 and taught at the University of Utah until 2015. She began her science writing career in 2012 with a AAAS-AMS mass media fellowship at Scientific American. For two thousand years, mathematicians tried to prove that Euclidean geometry, the geometry you probably learned in high school, was all there was. But it's not! In the early nineteenth century, János Bolyai and Nikolai Lobachevsky independently discovered that by tweaking one of Euclid's postulates, geometry can look totally different. We will explore the rich world of hyperbolic geometry, one of the new and beautiful systems of geometry that results from this tweak. Our guides on the adventure will be mathematically inspired artists and artistically inspired mathematicians, including M.C. Escher, Daina Taimina, and Henry Segerman.
John H. Conway - Doomsday, part 2
 
04:01
This video features John Horton Conway, and was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Interview by Bruce and Eve Torrence, filmed March 20, 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
Strategy #1: Engage in Successful Flailing
 
02:26
One can often identify to which topic a challenge belongs -- this question is about right triangles; this question is about repeating decimals -- but still have no clue as to how to start on the challenge. What should you do? Engage in successful flailing! Think about everything you know about right triangles or repeating decimals. Read the question out loud and then describe it again in different words. Draw a picture, perhaps even one relevant to the problem. Try an example with actual numbers. Mark something on the diagram. And so on. Read the strategy essay (http://www.maa.org/sites/default/files/pdf/CurriculumInspirations/essay1.pdf) and the explore the Curriculum Burst practice examples from the MAA AMC. - See more at: http://www.maa.org/math-competitions/teachers/curriculum-inspirations/Essay1 Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
"Mathematics and Music" with James Stewart
 
02:43
In "Mathematics and Music", James Stewart explores some of the connections and analogies between mathematics and music in an attempt to explain why mathematicians tend to be musical. Listen to the full lecture here http://www.maa.org/news/042810Stewart.html This talk was part of MAA's Distinguished Lecture Series, sponsored by the National Security Agency.
David Kung  on "Symphonic Equations: Waves and Tubes"
 
11:17
David Kung (St Mary's College of Maryland) presents "Symphonic Equations: Waves and Tubes"--a miniexcursion into math and music. Kung presented the MAA Distinguished Lecture "Symphonic Equations: A Mathematical Exploration of Music" at the Carnegie Institution for Science. Cellist Yvonne Caruthers and flutist Aaron Goldman, both members of the National Symphony Orchestra, joined him during his lecture which was cosponsored by Math for America - DC. Read more here: http://www.maa.org/dist-lecture/2013DL_SymphonicEquations.html Watch the full MAA Distinguished Lecture "Symphonic Equations: A Mathematical Exploration of Music" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaUH14o74D8
What was math like for you in school?
 
03:19
James Tanton answers questions sent in by students who participated in our Google Connected Classroom (http://bit.ly/1pvTaia). Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
Louis H. Kauffman - Rope Tricks, part1
 
03:31
This video features Louis Kauffman, and was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Interview by Bruce and Eve Torrence, filmed March 21, 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
Knot Theory, Experimental Mathematics, and 3D Printing
 
10:23
Laura Taalman, a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at James Madison University, discusses using technology to explore mathematics. Taalman presented an MAA Distinguished Lecture on February 19, 2014 (http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-...).
"Gems of Ramanujan and their Lasting Impact on Mathematics", Ken Ono
 
21:30
Ramanujan's work has had a truly transformative effect on modern mathematics, and continues to do so as we understand further lines from his letters and notebooks. In Ken Ono's lecture, some of the studies of Ramanujan that are most accessible to the general public will be presented and how Ramanujan's findings fundamentally changed modern mathematics, and also influenced his work, will be discussed.
Strategy #9: Avoid Hard Work
 
01:42
No one enjoys hard computation or a tedious grind through formulas and equations. Brute-force work should be undertaken only as a last resort! Do what a mathematician does - think very hard first to devise a creative, elegant approach that avoids hard work! Read the strategy essay (http://www.maa.org/sites/default/files/pdf/CurriculumInspirations/essay9.pdf) and the explore the Curriculum Burst practice examples from the MAA AMC. http://www.maa.org/node/129120/ Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
What class should every math major take?
 
01:39
James Tanton answers questions sent in by students who participated in our Google Connected Classroom (http://bit.ly/1pvTaia). Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
Strategy #5: Solve a Smaller Version of the Same Problem
 
02:08
A large, complex task can be made comprehensible by examining a smaller, analogous version. This powerful technique applies to mathematics research too. Read the strategy essay (http://www.maa.org/sites/default/files/pdf/CurriculumInspirations/essay5.pdf) and then explore the Curriculum Burst practice examples from the MAA AMC http://www.maa.org/node/129116/ Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
Make Your Own Impossible Cylinder--Mathematical Association of America's Math Horizons
 
01:19
DIY your own mathematical optical illusion! Download this printable template (pdf) from the Mathematical Association of America: http://bit.ly/ImpossibleCylinder Read about the mathematics behind this illusion in "Sugihara's Impossible Cylinder" (David Richeson, Math Horizons, September 2016, pp. 18–19, http://www.maa.org/MathHorizons. Math Horizons is a publication of the Mathematical Association of America). Video and corresponding article are both creative products of David Richeson. This work was inspired by Sugihara's "Ambiguous Cylinder Illusion": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWfFco7K9v8
Larger or Smaller? by Peter Winkler
 
11:41
Peter Winkler, William Morrill Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Dartmouth College, presents two number games, both of which involve guessing whether a certain number is the larger or the smaller of two numbers. Winkler delivered the MAA Distinguished Lecture "Games People Don't Play" on April 23, 2014. http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-events/games-people-dont-play
Colin Wright - Juggling & Maths, part 1
 
01:39
This video features Colin Wright and was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
Your Humble Servant, Is. Newton
 
10:17
Almost fifty years ago, Cambridge University Press published the correspondence of Isaac Newton, a seven-volume, 3000-page collection of letters that provides insight into this great, if difficult, genius. William Dunham shares his favorite examples of Newton as correspondent. He ends with Newton's most-quoted line about standing on the shoulders of giants and how his search for its place of origin led him, improbably, to a library in Philadelphia. Read more about this MAA Distinguished Lecture here: http://bit.ly/1fkUnV1
John H. Conway - Doomsday, part 3
 
02:37
This video features John Horton Conway, and was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Interview by Bruce and Eve Torrence, filmed March 20, 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
Colin Wright - Juggling & Maths, part 2
 
03:21
This video features Colin Wright and was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
Strategy #3: Engage in Wishful Thinking
 
02:28
As I tell my students: If there is something in life you want, make it happen! (And be then willing to handle the consequences of your actions with care and grace!) If there is an equation you wish to solve but wish there were a "+4" on the left ... make it happen! Add a 4 to the left, with the consequence of adding a 4 to the right as well. A beautiful problem-solving technique is to simply change the problem to what you wish it could be! Read the strategy essay (http://www.maa.org/sites/default/files/pdf/CurriculumInspirations/essay3.pdf) and then explore the Curriculum Burst practice examples from the MAA AMC http://www.maa.org/node/129114/ Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
When did you know you were a mathematician?
 
04:30
James Tanton answers questions sent in by students who participated in our Google Connected Classroom (http://bit.ly/1pvTaia). Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
"Folding a New Tomorrow: Origami Meets Math and Science," Thomas Hull
 
15:12
Origami, the art of paper folding, has been practiced in Japan and all over the world for centuries. The past decade, however, has witnessed a surge of interest in using origami for science. Applications in robotics, airbag design, deployment of space structures, and even medicine and bioengineering are appearing in the popular science press. Videos of origami robots folding themselves up and walking away or performing tasks have gone viral in recent years. But if the art of paper folding is so old, why has there been an increase in origami applications now? One answer is because of mathematics. Advances in our understanding of how folding processes work has arisen due to success in modeling origami mathematically. In this presentation we will explore why origami lends itself to mathematical study and see some of the math that has allowed applications to become so fruitful.
NUMB3RS Creators Win 2010 JPBM Award
 
02:32
Nicolas Falacci and Cheryl Heuton, the creators of the hit television series NUMB3RS, were the recipients of the 2010 JPBM Communications Award. The show's portrayal of the power and enjoyment of mathematics has helped to make audiences aware of the ubiquity of mathematics in their daily lives. The prize was given during the 2011 Joint Mathematics Meetings in New Orleans. Falacci and Heuton were unable to attend in person and sent a video acceptance speech. Full Math in the News article - http://cot.ag/dYNjzR
Terms in a Sequence
 
03:38
James Tanton takes viewers through question #19 from the 2004 MAA AMC 10B competition. Appropriate for the 10th grade level, this question covers Functions. Common Core State Standards (CCSS): F-IF.3 Read the Curriculum Burst essay that goes with this question here: http://www.maa.org/sites/default/files/pdf/CurriculumInspirations/CB198_Terms-in-a-Sequence.pdf Watch the Strategy Video referenced in this question here: http://youtu.be/3AWX_X3zUao Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
Mixed Ages
 
03:52
James Tanton takes viewers through question #17 from the 2004 MAA AMC 10B competition. Appropriate for the 10th grade level, this question covers algebra. Common Core State Standards (CCSS): A-CED.3 Read the Curriculum Burst essay that goes with this question here: http://www.maa.org/sites/default/files/pdf/CurriculumInspirations/CB157_Mixed- Ages.pdf Watch the Strategy Video referenced in this question here: http://youtu.be/k_73It1kd1E Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
A Card Trick Based on the Gilbreath Principle
 
02:22
Eve Torrence demonstrates a mathematical card trick. This video was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
"Math and the Vote", Moon Duchin
 
11:28
Moon Duchin is an associate professor of Mathematics at Tufts University and is the founding director of Tufts' new interdisciplinary Program in Science, Technology, and Society, which spans scholarly approaches to putting science in social context. In math, her work is in low-dimensional geometric topology, geometric group theory, and dynamics Voting is actually a really hard math problem: how do you fairly aggregate the preferences of millions of people into a single authoritative outcome? In this talk, Duchin weaves together math, politics, and civil rights to tell a collection of different stories clustered around the idea of "one person, one vote."
Two Trees
 
01:50
James Tanton takes viewers through this question from the 2010 MAA AMC 8 Competition. Appropriate for the 8th grade level, this question covers Ratio and Proportion. Common Core State Standards (CCSS): 6.RP.1; 7.RP.2; 7.RP.3 Read the essay that goes with this question here: http://bit.ly/120Qocv or watch the video http://youtu.be/1Z9XIS-sSZU Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
Prime Numbers: Progress and Pitfalls
 
09:55
Speaking at the MAA Carriage House on November 11, Daniel Goldston (San Jose State University) offered insight into both prime numbers and the people who study them. Read more: http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-events/prime-numbers-progress-and-pitfalls
What to Expect When You're Expecting to Win the Lottery
 
08:32
Recounting one of the stories included in his book How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking, Jordan Ellenberg (University of Wisconsin-Madison) tells how a group of MIT students exploited a loophole in the Massachusetts State Lottery to win game after game, eventually pocketing more than $3 million. Ellenberg delivered an MAA Distinguished Lecture on June 11, 2014: http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-events/how-to-get-rich-playing-the-lottery
PIC Math - Creating More Realistic Animation for Movies - Segment I
 
04:19
Dr. Alex McAdams, Senior Software Engineer at Walt Disney Animation Studios, talks about how mathematics is used to make realistic, yet art directable, animations.
A Line through Lattice Points
 
06:23
James Tanton takes viewers through this question from the 2011 MAA AMC 10B Competition. Appropriate for the lower high-school grade levels, this question covers Lines. Slope.. Read the Curriculum Burst essay that goes with this question here: http://bit.ly/1n3WZtP (PDF). Read the Strategy Essay for this Question http://www.maa.org/node/129121 Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
Whats the Domain?
 
03:55
James Tanton takes viewers through this question from the 2006 MAA AMC 12a Competition. Appropriate for the 12th grade level, this question covers Functions: Notation, Domain and Range. Read the essay that goes with this question here: http://bit.ly/Md08Ja (PDF). Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level
The Magic and Math of Mental Calculation by Art Benjamin
 
01:18:30
"If I were performing for a different sort of audience, like, say, at the Magic Castle in Hollywood, I might follow this up with other feats of magic and mind," mathemagician (and Harvey Mudd College professor) Art Benjamin told the 300-plus people gathered at the Carnegie Institution for Science on October 23 to hear him speak. - See more at: http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-events/the-magic-and-math-of-mental-calculation#sthash.TxarTQkf.dpuf
Gothic Windows
 
05:40
James Tanton takes viewers through this question from the 2009 MAA AMC 10A Competition. Appropriate for the lower high-school grade levels, this question covers geometry. Read the Curriculum Burst essay that goes with this question here: http://bit.ly/1hvaJJ0 (PDF). Read the Strategy Essay for this Question http://www.maa.org/node/129112/ Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
Louis H. Kauffman - Rope Tricks, part2
 
06:43
This video features Louis Kauffman, and was produced for Mathematics Awareness Month 2014. Interview by Bruce and Eve Torrence, filmed March 21, 2014. Visit www.mathaware.org for more.
Dan Meyer: "Math's Other Half" at MAA MathFest 2017
 
42:08
Dan Meyer gave the MAA James R. C. Leitzel Lecture at MAA MathFest 2017 in Chicago, IL. His lecture is titled "Math's Other Half." Lecture abstract: Whatever your job title, you are also an ambassador from the world of those who love math to the world of those who fear math. Your ambassadorship will either produce more people who love math or more people who fear math. Your effect will be non-zero. But the math that people fear is often just one half of math. Let's discuss methods for helping fearful people encounter math's other half.
PIC Math - Creating More Realistic Animation for Movies - Segment II
 
15:19
Prof. Joseph Teran of the Department of Mathematics at UCLA gives an overview of the numerical linear algebra and iterative method techniques that are used to simulate physical phenomena such as water, fire, smoke, and elastic deformations in the movie and gaming industries.
Triangles before Logarithms: Trigonometry in the Lost Century
 
01:00:34
Although all triangles (plane and spherical) could already be solved in the early 16th century, trigonometry advanced almost beyond recognition by the time logarithms were invented in 1614. From just the sine function, all six of our current functions were born. With the new functions and the numerical tables that came with them, the theory could be enhanced, simplified, and made more elegant. Most crucially, rather than existing simply as a handmaiden to the astronomy that had given it life, trigonometry became a powerful tool in geography, optics, navigation, surveying, even architecture. This was the period, and trigonometry was the subject, that placed mathematics at the center of a quantitative scientific approach to our world that still flourishes today. Glen Van Brummelen (Quest University) tells the story. Read more about this lecture at http://www.maa.org/meetings/calendar-events/triangles-before-logarithms-trigonometry-in-the-lost-century
What was the hardest thing you learned when studying math?
 
03:08
James Tanton answers questions sent in by students who participated in our Google Connected Classroom (http://bit.ly/1pvTaia). Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
"Folding a New Tomorrow: Origami Meets Math and Science," Thomas Hull
 
56:29
Origami, the art of paper folding, has been practiced in Japan and all over the world for centuries. The past decade, however, has witnessed a surge of interest in using origami for science. Applications in robotics, airbag design, deployment of space structures, and even medicine and bioengineering are appearing in the popular science press. Videos of origami robots folding themselves up and walking away or performing tasks have gone viral in recent years. But if the art of paper folding is so old, why has there been an increase in origami applications now? One answer is because of mathematics. Advances in our understanding of how folding processes work has arisen due to success in modeling origami mathematically. In this presentation we will explore why origami lends itself to mathematical study and see some of the math that has allowed applications to become so fruitful.
Andrew Granville Interview Clip
 
05:12
Université de Montréal's Andrew Granville discusses his current research interests.
Problem Solving Moment in the Classroom #1: Geometry
 
03:47
Who chose "360" for the count of degrees in a circle? Why that number?
Overlapping Circle and Square
 
03:18
James Tanton takes viewers through this question from the 2005 MAA AMC 8 Competition. Appropriate for the middle school grade levels, this question covers Algebra; Percentages. Read the Curriculum Burst essay that goes with this question here: http://bit.ly/1tY3tOP (PDF). Read the Strategy Essay for this Question http://www.maa.org/node/129120 Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations
Martin Gardner Communications Award
 
14:09
In 1994, the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics (AMS, MAA, SIAM) presented Martin Gardner with the Communications Award at Gardner's home. Martin Gardner (1914-2010) was a prolific writer, bringing recreational mathematics to a wide, appreciative audience over many years.
Intersecting Tetrahedra
 
06:38
James Tanton takes viewers through this question from the 2010 MAA AMC 10a Competition. Appropriate for the 10th and 12th grade level, this question covers Geometry: Solids; Effect of Scale on Volume; Symmetry. Read the Curriculum Burst essay that goes with this question here: http://bit.ly/1dtQGO7 (PDF). Read the Strategy Essay for this Question http://www.maa.org/node/129115 Curriculum Inspirations is brought to you by the Mathematical Association of America and the MAA American Mathematics Competitions. Learn more here: http://www.maa.org/curriculum-inspirations MAA acknowledges with gratitude the generous contributions of the following donors to the Curriculum Inspirations Project: The TBL and Akamai Foundations for providing continuing support The Mary P. Dolciani Halloran Foundation for providing seed funding by supporting the Dolciani Visiting Mathematician Program during fall 2012 MathWorks for its support at the Winner's Circle Level