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IBM Laptop Computers & Products : The History of IBM
 
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The history of IBM started in the late 1800s when the company manufactured mechanical goods. In the 1970s, they began making computer mainframes and eventually PCs. Find out how IBM sold their personal computer division to a company called Lenovo in 2007 with information from the owner of a computer service store in this free video on IBM computers and products.
Views: 1233 eHowTech
IBM Tape History - Session 2: Overview of Tape Products and Product Management Part 1
 
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Interviewed by Tom Gardner on 2015-10-13 in Tucson AZ X7617.2016 © Computer History Museum This is session two of five sessions held in Tucson, AZ, regarding IBM’s tape storage history. The five sessions are: 1. Tape Media (CHM catalog number: 102737991) 2. Overview of tape products and product management (CHM catalog number: 102737993) 3. 3480 tape drive (CHM catalog number: 102738020) 4. Linear Tape Open (LTO) Consortium (CHM catalog number: 102738022) 5. Recovery of tapes damaged in Challenger disaster (CHM catalog number: 102738024). See IBM Tape History Session 1: Media for an overview of IBM Tucson. This session is broadly focused on IBM’s development and management of tape products. Within IBM product management has been distinguished from system management; well into the 1990s product development was the responsibility of a Lab Director whose direct reports would include engineering managers for the various products assigned as well as a Product Manager having one or more subordinates responsible for business aspects of the product. Today’s session includes a Tucson Lab Director (Teale) and two tape product managers (Levine and Rizzi). * Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further information - http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102737994 Visit computerhistory.org/collections/oralhistories/ for more information about the Computer History Museum's Oral History Collection. Lot number: X7618.2016 Catalog number: 102737993
IBM Tape History - Session 2: Overview of Tape Products and Product Management Part 2
 
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Interviewed by Tom Gardner on 2015-10-13 in Tucson AZ X7617.2016 © Computer History Museum This is session two of five sessions held in Tucson, AZ, regarding IBM’s tape storage history. The five sessions are: 1. Tape Media (CHM catalog number: 102737991) 2. Overview of tape products and product management (CHM catalog number: 102737993) 3. 3480 tape drive (CHM catalog number: 102738020) 4. Linear Tape Open (LTO) Consortium (CHM catalog number: 102738022) 5. Recovery of tapes damaged in Challenger disaster (CHM catalog number: 102738024). See IBM Tape History Session 1: Media for an overview of IBM Tucson. This session is broadly focused on IBM’s development and management of tape products. Within IBM product management has been distinguished from system management; well into the 1990s product development was the responsibility of a Lab Director whose direct reports would include engineering managers for the various products assigned as well as a Product Manager having one or more subordinates responsible for business aspects of the product. Today’s session includes a Tucson Lab Director (Teale) and two tape product managers (Levine and Rizzi). * Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further information - http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102737994 Visit computerhistory.org/collections/oralhistories/ for more information about the Computer History Museum's Oral History Collection. Lot number: X7618.2016 Catalog number: 102737993
1919-1970 IBM Vintage Computing film - IBM History, Educational
 
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Partially restored from an ancient VHS copy, this vintage film shows IBM’s impressive growth and product versatility from 1919 to about 1970. The first two minutes of the film are missing, it starts at the year 1919. At that time the company was still called CTR for “Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company.” CTR was renamed "International Business Machines" in 1924. Provided for educational and historical purposes; Computer History Archives Project. (Film courtesy of IBM Archives.) Highlights: 0:19 IBM Convention, Endicott New York in 1919 0:22 Vertical card sorter; Tabulating Machines 01:10 IBM Executive School, sales staff 01:50 Thomas J. Watson, Sr., 1924 IBM named 02:05 The 100 percent club, Atlantic City 02:40 Old numerical printers 05:15 First IBM 600 Multiplier machine 1929 06:00 Thomas J. Watson, Sr., speaks *** 06:51 Thomas J. Watson, Jr., speaks 09:28 World War II influences 10:32 War ends; 10:34 Digital Computing Machine production 13:55 Random Access devices 17:00 IBM System/360 18:00 1964 IBM day at New York World’s Fair 18:20 President Eisenhower with Mr. Watson 19:00 Business and scientific applications & more Click to visit our other Computer History videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOyJD0RHtF_77_oAf5tT1nQ/videos
IBM Unveil first workable graphene chip - This is REAL Genius
 
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Computing giant IBM have demonstrated the first advanced, integrated graphene circuit - the first time the single-atom-thick carbon-based wonder material has been manufactured into a commercial grade component. Graphene has the potential to create far more capable, faster, cheaper, smaller chips than silicon due to its incredible conductive properties and fine scale. Unfortunately that fine scale has so far been it's downfall - minor production defects can ruin the chip's extraordinary functionality and have so far made commercial production impossible. Connect with This is Genius! https://www.facebook.com/thisisgenius - Facebook http://www.twitter.com/thisisgenius - Twitter http://www.google.com/+thisisgenius - Google+ This is Genius is a channel dedicated to experiencing the unusual side of life. Comedy, sketches and tongue-in cheek location reports from around the world. We use a lot of music by a chap called StoneOcean, a little label for him appears in our videos when we do. Like his stuff? Check out his channel. StoneOcean's music: www.stoneocean.info StoneOcean's channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/RatedmusicOfficial Check out some of our other videos: http://bit.ly/17XvmhO -- We get our skate on with Nitro Circus http://bit.ly/17WrAQr -- Flying a helicopter with your brain. And no hands. http://bit.ly/1au5kBI -- How many pegs can I fit on my face? http://bit.ly/1hiqln1 - What's it like to be 80 for the day? http://bit.ly/17UnFXE -- We went to actual Tokyo to be actual Samurai's with the actual green power ranger. Looking for the old This is Genius? Ok, here you are: http://bit.ly/195Zhzb -- That was Genius 2012 http://bit.ly/1jKjFeo -- That was Genius late 2011 http://bit.ly/1jKjGPt -- That was Genius early 2011 http://bit.ly/Ih6WEp -- That was Genius late 2010 http://bit.ly/1dB3F0O -- That was Genius early 2010
Views: 302949 This Is Genius
1962 IBM 1440 Data Processing System Computer History Archives Project Chet Huntley NBC
 
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If you remember 1962, you may remember Chet Huntley, television news journalist who co-anchored NBC's Huntley-Brinkley Report. IBM chose Chet to host this special IBM product release for the IBM 1440 Data Processing System. This is one of the most professional early IBM product release films I’ve ever seen. Hope you will enjoy it too. Many thanks to Techworks’ Center for Technology & Innovation, Binghamton, NY (www.ctandi.org), and to IBM Corporation for this fascinating historical discussion. About 45 minutes. At time index 39:30, one of the IBM representatives displays a tiny scale model of the whole 1440 computer system. Years past, some IBM salesmen carried around little “Barbie doll” sized computer equipment to help them demonstrate to potential clients what the different components of the IBM systems were used for. For further information, please visit: https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history http://www.ctandi.org/ Click to visit our other Computer History videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOyJD0RHtF_77_oAf5tT1nQ/videos
IBM Tape History - Session 4: LTO Virtual Company Panel Part 1
 
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Interviewed by Tom Gardner on 2015-10-15 in Tucson AZ X7617.2016 © Computer History Museum This is session four of five sessions held in Tucson, AZ, regarding IBM’s tape storage history. The five sessions are: 1. Tape Media (CHM catalog number: 102737991) 2. Overview of tape products and product management (CHM catalog number: 102737993) 3. 3480 tape drive (CHM catalog number: 102738020) 4. Linear Tape Open (LTO) Consortium (CHM catalog number: 102738022) 5. Recovery of tapes damaged in Challenger disaster (CHM catalog number: 102738024). See IBM Tape History Session 1: Media for an overview of IBM Tucson. This session is about the Linear Tape Open consortium organized by HP, IBM and Seagate beginning 1997. * Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further information - http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102738023 Visit computerhistory.org/collections/oralhistories/ for more information about the Computer History Museum's Oral History Collection. Lot number: X7684.2016 Catalog number: 102738022
L'Oréal + IBM: A Makeover for Industry 4.0
 
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A look inside how L’Oreal is taking on an Industry 4.0 transformation with the help of agile operations, artificial intelligence and the internet of things. Learn more about how it all works: IBM Services: https://ibm.co/2A7Vdop Enhanced product optimization: https://ibm.co/2QSOeXs Connecting, managing and analyzing IoT data: https://ibm.co/2Fzo1fz
Views: 5566 IBM
IBM FlashSystem 9100: Product Overview
 
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In this video, Andy Walls introduces IBM FlashSystem 9100, a powerful all-flash array that combines IBM FlashCore, IBM Spectrum Virtualize, & NVMe for up to 350 TB physical and 1 PB effective capacity in a compact 2U form factor.
Views: 3341 IBM Storage
The best IBM internal presentation - EVER!
 
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‘Way back in the late 70s, when small computers for business hardly existed, the IBM Corporation took notice and funded two projects, more-or-less at the same time. The first was the System/23 Datamaster. This was a desktop computer aimed at the small business market. It was a follow-on to the IBM 5100 and IBM 5110, small scientific computers that the IBM sales force (literally) “forced” into the small business arena because of their compact size and (relatively) low cost. The Datamaster was to have a dramatically different development methodology. To cut communication time and improve efficiency, all of the stakeholders (industry marketing, software development, business analysis and hardware development) would all be housed together in a single location: the IBM Boca Raton plant. It was thought that the development cycle could be shortened to (only) about 30 months between inception and delivery. Before this, product development took so long that by the time the product reached the market, the original requirements defining the project changed dramatically. At the same time, Don Estridge pitched and sold to IBM Managment that he could do the same thing in twelve months with a smaller team and outsourced components. His project, also housed in Boca Raton, yielded the IBM Personal Computer. Don started later but finished only a month behind the Datamaster. Datamaster was announced in July 1981 and the PC in August. The market spoke (loudly) and the System/23 Datamaster never shipped many units; the PC was just so compelling (and cheaper, and faster) — and a clear winner in the marketplace. But before we knew how this was going to sort out, a software development team was moved to Boca Raton in July 1978 to join the hardware project for Datamaster which was already underway. IBM was commited to delivering the best version of general business software for these new products. We were going to make the most usable software in history. This video is a presentation I made scores of times selling the IBM-developed business applications and development methodology inside IBM. The six applications we were building were Billing, Inventory Control, Accounts Receivable, General Ledger, Accounts Payable and Payroll. In IBM slang, “BICARGLAPPR” pronounced By-car-glap-er.. The central part of the 33 minute presentation was describing the Human Factors Laboratory we built to test the usability of our software. This was attention that products had seldom benefitted from up to this point. It’s nothing like any other presentation ever made inside IBM; trust me. This presentation has since passed into legend; an old VHS copy was found recently and enhanced by Jim Leonard (thanks, Jim!) and brought to you here. I hope you’re amused (and maybe educated a little).. Oh, and one more thing. In this presentation there are two short clips you should absolutely see. One is at 24:28 and the other at 31:22. This story has been around IBM for more than 30 years. It concerns an instruction to "remove the diskette from its protective envelope". Enjoy! Chaz Cone
Views: 1314 Chaz Cone
#6: IBM Head of Design, Phil Gilbert, wields $100M and 1,300 designers to bring design back to IBM
 
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Phil Gilbert is the GM and Head of Design at IBM. In this episode, he discusses creating IBM's proprietary design thinking methodology, their own design school for new graduates, and what he's going to do with the $100 Million that IBM has entrusted to him to bring design back to IBM's roots. --- FOLLOW US Twitter: http://twitter.com/highrespodcast Facebook: http://facebook.com/highrespodcast iTunes: http://bit.ly/highresitunes Google Play: http://bit.ly/highresgoogle Get early access to the next episode: http://highresolution.design/early-access --- THANKS TO OUR PARTNERS IBM – IBM's mission is simple: put the user at the center of our products. If you are a passionate problem-solver, able to empathize with users and turn that empathy into design insight, we want you to join us in creating exceptional experiences that span our vast product portfolio. Learn about the team! http://bit.ly/ibmsponsor InVision – InVision is the world's leading product design platform, powering the future of digital product design through our deep understanding of the dynamics of collaboration. Teams that build digital products are at a serious advantage when they use InVision's suite of prototyping tools. They're a great way of getting everyone on board. Get 3 full months on InVision FREE http://bit.ly/invisionpartner Searle Video – Searle Video is a creative studio based out of Portland, Oregon. They've helped the creative community tell stories for over 10 years. They've done advertisements, behind the scenes stories, and documentaries for companies like Slack, Intel, Adobe, Google and the XOXO festival. http://bit.ly/searlesponsor
Views: 20301 High Resolution
IBM Tape History - Session 1: Tape Media Part 1
 
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Interviewed by Tom Gardner on 2015-10-12 in Tucson AZ X7617.2016 © Computer History Museum This is session one of five sessions held in Tucson, AZ, regarding IBM’s tape storage history. The five sessions are: 1. Tape Media (CHM catalog number: 102737991) 2. Overview of tape products and product management (CHM catalog number: 102737993) 3. 3480 tape drive (CHM catalog number: 102738020) 4. Linear Tape Open (LTO) Consortium (CHM catalog number: 102738022) 5. Recovery of tapes damaged in Challenger disaster (CHM catalog number: 102738024). IBM’s tape development began in the late 1940s in the Kenyon Mansion, Poughkeepsie, NY, (later IBM’s management training site) and moved to the then new Poughkeepsie lab in 1954. The first production units shipped in 1952. In 1965 production and development moved to Boulder, Colorado, then from Boulder to San Jose, California in 1973 and then back to Boulder in 1977 . Its movement to Tucson, Arizona, was announced that same year and began in 1978. IBM Tucson was responsible for a number of tape innovations including the 3480 tape drive and cartridge and the consortium that led to the LTO standard. Employment in Tucson peaked in the mid-1980s at more than 5,000. Production was ended at Tucson in the late 1980s. New media product development ended in 1988. New tape drive development ended in the mid-1990s. As of 2016 IBM in Tucson continued to participate in tape standards development as a part of the LTO Consortium as well as managing IBM storage products . This session on media is primarily focused on the development of the chromium dioxide media first introduced by IBM for the 3480 tape drive; however it includes information on the earlier reel-to-reel tape media as well as the 3850 Mass Storage media. * Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further information - http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102737992 Visit computerhistory.org/collections/oralhistories/ for more information about the Computer History Museum's Oral History Collection. Lot number: X7617.2016 Catalog number: 102737991
Product Manager Interview: Rich Edwards, Product Management Director at IBM
 
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Product Management Interview with Rich Edwards where he talks about his experience as IBM's Product Managers Director. 😱 The video was moved here: https://youtu.be/p0gI5txiNt0 👉 Subscribe here: http://bit.ly/2xMQLbS 🕊️ Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2xAQklN 💙 Like us on Facebook for free event tickets: http://bit.ly/2xPfjkh 📷 Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2eHmfJp A career as a product manager sounds interesting to you, but you might not know what the exact job entails. You've probably spent some hours finding, collecting and analyzing opinions and advice on product management jobs, but you haven't heard much directly from a product manager. Rich Edwards, Program Director of Product Management at IBM's Watson Developer Cloud division, reveals his experience working in the B2B world as a product manager. Rich brings to the interview 8 years of product management experience at one of the largest tech companies, IBM. As a hiring manager, he shares what he looks for in a product management candidate and how you can blow your product management interviewer away. Rich also talks about what aspiring product managers should be doing in their spare time to really stand out as the ideal product management candidate. Find out more about us: http://bit.ly/2i1K82R 💻 ABOUT US: We host product management, data and coding events every week in Silicon Valley, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Orange County and New York. Click here to see what we have coming up: http://bit.ly/2wKzNLc Product School is the world’s first tech business school. We offer certified Product Management, Coding, and Data courses; our instructors are real-world managers working at top tech companies such as Google, Facebook, Snapchat, Airbnb, LinkedIn, PayPal, and Netflix. Our classes are part-time, designed to fit into your work schedule, and the campuses are located in Silicon Valley, San Francisco, New York, Orange County and Los Angeles. Product leaders from local top tech companies visit Product School campuses each week. Through lectures, panel discussions, and a variety of other forums, the world’s top product managers visit Product School to provide invaluable real-world insights into critical management issues. If you want to become a product manager in 8 weeks, see our upcoming courses here: http://bit.ly/2i1K82R 📓 The Product Book has arrived! Learn how to become a great Product Manager. On sale for a limited time. Get your copy here: http://amzn.to/2uJqg9A
Running IBM 604, 1948 computer
 
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The IBM 604 Electronic Calculating Punch with Type 521 Card Reader/Punch, 1948. The 604 performed addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division hundreds of times faster than any of IBM's earlier electromechanical machines, and was the first IBM product to use modular vacuum-tube based pluggable units, later used in IBM's NORC and 701 computers. The 604 was programmable via plugboard and could execute a program of up to about 60 steps. Footprint: 53 by 33 inches; contained 1100 vacuum tubes and 125 relays. Power consumption 7.59 Kva. Weight: 1949 pounds. More than 5000 were sold (or, rather, rented at $645 per month, 1948 dollars, for the 604 and 521). I filmed this for an exhibion which was held in 2008/9 at the Amsterdam based Science Center NEMO. I asked if the film could be released to the public: that could be done, if a NEMO sign would appear in the video. Hence: here it is. The voice explaining how it works belongs to Hans Sprengler of the IBM museum in Sindelfingen, Germany: "Haus zur Geschichte der IBM Datenverarbeitung", or the House of the History of IBM Data Processing.
Views: 152279 Krijn Soeteman
IBM: How a Saloon Piano Gave Birth to Your Computer
 
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Support us on Patreon to get early access to our future videos: https://www.patreon.com/business_casual Join us at our subreddit and on social media: Reddit: https://reddit.com/r/businesscasual Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/business.casual.yt Twitter: https://twitter.com/BusinessCasual0 First video of the Behind the Business Series. International Business Machines (commonly referred to as IBM) is an American multinational technology company. The company originated in 1911 thanks to punch card technology inspired by saloon pianos. IBM was originally called the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company (CTR) and was renamed "International Business Machines" in 1924. IBM manufactures and markets computer hardware, middleware and software, and offers hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. IBM is also a major research organization, holding the record for most patents generated by a business (as of 2017) for 24 consecutive years. Inventions by IBM include the automated teller machine (ATM), the floppy disk, the hard disk drive, the magnetic stripe card, the relational database, the SQL programming language, the UPC barcode, and dynamic random-access memory (DRAM).
Views: 130112 Business Casual
What are the IBM Product Lifecycle and EOS?
 
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This video will help you understand the stages of the IBM Product Lifecycle, including End of Support.
Views: 59 IBMTraining
Stage 3D Video Mapping, Product Launching IBM Conference & Exhibition 2012
 
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Stage 3D Video Mapping, Product Launching IBM Conference & Exhibition 2012 Amazing Work NOTE: This is for promotional and entertaining purposes only, all rights goes to IBM and the cooperating companies that participated in the making of the event. "Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."
Views: 3507 Satish Singh
IBM products and Cloud Computing
 
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Robert Varker and Phil Sheehan takes us through some of the Cloud optimized IBM products. For insight, opportunities and solutions to the many issues confronting businesses today visit: http://bit.ly/BIBlog and don't forget to follow us on Twitter - @ IBMbizInsight
Views: 219 NZBusinessInsight
Brand NEW IBM PC AT + Model M! Unboxing & Setup [LGR]
 
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I was fortunate to be able to buy a sealed, new old stock IBM PC 5170 built in the year 1988! What a rare treat. Join me in savoring each piece of retro tech as I set it up with PC-DOS 3.30 and EGA graphics. ● Consider supporting LGR on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/LazyGameReviews ● Social links: https://twitter.com/lazygamereviews https://www.facebook.com/LazyGameReviews ● Music used in order of appearance: "Suits and Neckties 1" http://www.epidemicsound.com
Views: 1900970 LGR
IBM Buys Red Hat | Ask Noah Show 94
 
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In the largest software company acquisition in history, tech giant IBM has purchased Red Hat for 34 billion dollars. The open source community was shocked and devastated at first but is it too soon to judge? What has IBM really purchased a product or a culture? We explain why this could be the best thing ever to happen to Linux and FOSS! Show Notes & Download: http://podcast.asknoahshow.com/94 Support Jupiter Broadcasting on Patreon ------------- http://bit.ly/jbsignal --- Jupiter Broadcasting Shows --- Ask Noah ------------------------ http://podcast.asknoahshow.com Coder Radio -------------------- http://coder.show Linux Action News ---------- http://linuxactionnews.com Linux Unplugged ------------- http://linuxunplugged.com BSD Now ------------------------- http://bit.ly/bsdnow Unfilter ---------------------------- http://unfilter.show Tech Talk Today ------------- http://techtalk.today TechSNAP ----------------------- http://techsnap.systems User Error ------------------------ http://bit.ly/usererror --- Social Media --- Youtube ------------------- http://bit.ly/jupiteryoutube Twitter --------------------- http://bit.ly/jupitertwitter Facebook ----------------- http://bit.ly/jupiterfacebook Instagram ---------------- http://bit.ly/jupiterinstagram G+ --------------------------- http://bit.ly/jbgplus Reddit --------------------- http://bit.ly/jbreddit --- Support --- Patreon ------------------- http://bit.ly/jbsignal Patreon ------------------- http://bit.ly/jbunfilter Paypal --------------------- http://bit.ly/jupiterpaypal JB Stickers -------------- http://bit.ly/jbstickers • Jupiter Broadcasting © CC-BY-ND 2018 •
IBM Tape History - Session 3: 3480 Tape Drive
 
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Interviewed by Tom Gardner on 2015-10-14 in Tucson AZ X7617.2016 © Computer History Museum This is session three of five sessions held in Tucson, AZ, regarding IBM’s tape storage history. The five sessions are: 1. Tape Media (CHM catalog number: 102737991) 2. Overview of tape products and product management (CHM catalog number: 102737993) 3. 3480 tape drive (CHM catalog number: 102738020) 4. Linear Tape Open (LTO) Consortium (CHM catalog number: 102738022) 5. Recovery of tapes damaged in Challenger disaster (CHM catalog number: 102738024). See IBM Tape History Session 1: Tape Media for an overview of IBM Tucson. The primary focus of this session is on the mechanics of the 3480 tape drive. The mechanism evolved significantly from its first embodiment, code name Intrepid, through an intermediate version, Ocotillo, into the final shipped version, code name Saguaro. * Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further information - http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102738021 Visit computerhistory.org/collections/oralhistories/ for more information about the Computer History Museum's Oral History Collection. Lot number: X7619.2016 Catalog number: 102738020
Raivo Reigass, IBM Software Product Marketing Manager, ALSO
 
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IBM Cloud solutions for Mobile Device Security and Management
IBM Security AppScan Source Version 8.7 Product Overview
 
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In this course, you will examine the AppScan Source portfolio of products and their features. By the end of this training, you will be able to identify application security testing techniques and the AppScan Source solution to static application security testing. You should be able to describe the four products of AppScan Source and their features, configuration, and architecture. You will also view and be able to describe the three perspectives, features, and views of AppScan Source for Analysis.
Views: 8897 IBM Security
Thomas Watson Jr. Documentary - IBM Success Story
 
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http://www.evancarmichael.com/support/ - SUPPORT ME :) Today we're going to take a closer at a boy that was only concerned with drinking and partying and how he turned his life around to become a man that took the reins of a multinational company and built a brand like no other. This is the story of former IBM President and CEO Thomas Watson Jr. and the top 3 lessons that you can learn from his success. "Nothing is more vital to the continuous improvement of IBM than constructive suggestions or criticism by each of us - fairly given and fairly received." - Thomas Watson Jr. Thomas Watson Jr. (born January 14, 1914) was the son of IBM founder Thomas Watson Sr. When Thomas Watson Jr. stepped into his father's shoes as president of IBM in 1952, he knew they would be hard ones to fill. Not long before that, Watson Jr.'s life had consisted in large part of drinking and partying. IBM had always been a part of his life, but only in the context of his father's job. Was he ready to take the reins of this multinational company? Could he break out from his father's shadow and create his own legacy? In his teenage years, Watson Jr. began to suffer from depression. As a result, and also partly due to his undiagnosed dyslexia, he struggled to get through school. After being accepted into Brown University only as a favour to his prominent father, Watson received his business degree in 1937. Immediately upon graduating, Watson went to work for his father's growing company, IBM. He had little interest in the job, but was unsure of what to do with his life. It wasn't until World War II that Watson would find his calling. He enlisted in the Army Air Force and served as a pilot, chauffeuring top military leaders around the USSR -- and learning Russian in the meantime. In later years, Watson Jr. would recall how easily piloting came to him and how for the first time ever he had confidence in his abilities. It had been the suggestion of one of the army generals he had befriended during his service that Watson Jr. try to follow in the steps of his father. So, after the War, Watson Jr. did just that and returned to work at IBM. He was promptly promoted to Vice President after just six months, and placed on IBM's board of directors four months after that. After three years with IBM, Watson Jr. had become the company's Executive Vice-President, a position he would hold for another three years until 1952. It was in that year that Watson Sr. decided his eldest son was ready; no amount of additional grooming or training would prepare him for his next challenge. In 1952, Watson Sr. stepped aside and appointed his son as the new president of IBM. Indeed, Watson Jr. would not only create his own unique legacy as a businessman, but he would go on to become named as one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people of the 20th century. Under his leadership, IBM's revenues tripled and the company experienced a rate of growth that few other companies can rival even today. Action Item #1: Make the Workplace Great Action Item #2: Satisfy Your Customers Action Item #3: Integrate Integrity Into Your Business True Story Thomas Watson Sr. believed in staying with what you know, but Watson Jr. knew that this kind of thinking would not sustain a company forever. After taking over as President, Watson Jr. took the biggest risk he had ever taken by investing all of IBM's finances into researching and developing a new product line. That amounted to $5 billion of the company's money. This risk would not only bankrupt the company if it did not work, but make all the products IBM was currently making obsolete. Watson Jr. was sure that developing a computer that everyone could use was the wave of the future and after several delays, as well as near bankruptcy, IBM launched the System/360 in 1966. Instantly, the new computer was selling to everyone that could afford it. Between 1966 and 1970, IBM was selling more than 35,000 computers a year, when before it was only selling around 11,000. IBM revenues surpassed $7.5 billion for the first time in company history during this time. The gamble paid off. Quotes "It is essential for each of us to strive to retain originality and to maintain our identity as human beings." "This is a company of human beings not machines, personalities not products, people not real estate." "IBM's dedication to the dignity of the individual is no myth. To me it is the very essence of our success." What Do You Think? Do you make your company a great place to work? Do you go out of your way to satisfy your customers? Do you practice integrity in your personal and professional life and is it an integral part of your company philosophy? Tell me what you think by leaving a message below.
Views: 17220 Evan Carmichael
Packard Bell Executive Multimedia (1993) - The First IBM PC Compatible I owned
 
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● Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/RetroManCave ● MonsterJoysticks: https://monsterjoysticks.com/RMC ● 1ClickPrint: https://www.1clickprint.com#retromancave ● Cave Links Twitter:  https://twitter.com/TheRetroManCave Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/theretromancave/ Discord: https://discord.gg/7qYtGcz RMC Shop:  https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheRetroManCave ● Description My very first computer was the Packard Bell Executive Multimedia in 1993, so imagine my excitement when I snapped on up on Ebay for £25. It needed some refurbishment and then I was able to relive the first day of PC ownership I ever had. Join me in this video as I show you that experience, and let me know your own! ●Linked Videos Retrobrite Indoors - https://youtu.be/05RSh3d-EuA Restore Yellow Plastics - https://youtu.be/uyi5ZhHzzvo ● Music AI 2 - Vibe Mountain Classique - Francis Preve Manea 2 - Vibe Mountain Sunspots - Jeremy Blake Canyon.mid - Windows 3.11
Views: 25851 RetroManCave
IBM Visual Insights
 
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Identify and manage product defects via cognitive visual inspection to reduce manufacturing labor costs, and improve process throughput and product quality. Visual Insights identifies defects too small for the human eye. Learn more: https://ibm.co/VisualInsights IBM Visual Insights uses cognitive capabilities to review and analyze parts, components, and products and identify defects by matching patterns to images of defects that it has previously analyzed and classified. Create hundreds to thousands of defect models using cognitive and human expertise. Deploy models to edge computing on production lines to facilitate rapid image capture by camera and cognitive identification of defects. Quickly assess quality inspection metrics across manufacturing processes. Cognitive capabilities can help reduce inspection times, increase yield, and facilitate continuous process improvement.
Reinventing Technology Support with IBM Augmented Remote Assist
 
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Augmented Remote Assist from IBM is a mobile app that gives technology support technicians instant access to the expertise they need to perform complex diagnostics or repairs, any time of the day, anywhere on the globe. Augmented Remote Assist supports any product IBM chooses to maintain; offers unparalleled support for IBM clients on any device, anywhere, anytime; offers superior experience for both the field technician and the support expert by providing visual context for instructions, eliminating the need to refer to offline materials. Augmented Remote Assist enables: - Two-way real-time collaboration between remote expert and field technician - Uses real-time 3D modeling and AR tracking technology which removes the need to pre-train the scene recognition algorithms for annotation -Reduces time to access the instructions, reduces errors that would have resulted from incorrect verbal descriptions, reduces time to resolution, eliminates the need to dispatch a technician to the site by empowering technician already on site Augmented Remote Assist makes your life easier. IBM clients report significant savings in time and resources from the partnership with IBM Technology Support Services: - +2.5 years additional useful life of multivendor equipment - 20% Reduction in operating costs through outage mitigation and accelerated problem resolution - 37% Reduction in client time spent on hardware support - 43% Reduction in time managing vendor relationships - 94% First-call hardware success rate - 57% CAPEX savings from improved IT asset management - 64% Incidents automatically resolved by virtual engineers IBM Technology Support Services helps you reduce complexity, decrease costs and ensure availability with a single source for all IT support needs. With 57 support centers worldwide with regional and localized language support; 19,000 IT support specialists worldwide who know technology; 585 parts centers with 1.3 million IBM and non-IBM parts; 11 global research laboratories; 114 hardware and software development laboratories and 30,000 multivendor products supported IBM Technology Support can help achieve 40% reduction in problem determination time by using IBM® Watson® , having so far over 6 million combined hardware and software requests. To learn more please visit us: ibm.biz/multivendorsupport
Views: 936 IBM IT Services
CRAZY 1500 DRONE GIVEAWAY with IBM!
 
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Thanks to IBM for sponsoring this video! IBM Developer is giving away 1,500 drones, along with the tools to program it. Enter for your chance to win #IBMDroneDrop: https://ibm.biz/dronedrop (USA and Canada Only) Buy DJI Tello: On Amazon: https://lmg.gg/djitello Discuss on the forum: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1002278-crazy-1500-drone-giveaway-with-ibm/ Our Affiliates, Referral Programs, and Sponsors: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/75969-linus-tech-tips-affiliates-referral-programs-and-sponsors Get Private Internet Access today at http://geni.us/7lLuafK Linus Tech Tips merchandise at http://www.designbyhumans.com/shop/LinusTechTips/ Linus Tech Tips posters at http://crowdmade.com/linustechtips Our Test Benches on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/shop/linustechtips Our production gear: http://geni.us/cvOS Twitter - https://twitter.com/linustech Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/LinusTech Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/linustech Twitch - https://www.twitch.tv/linustech Intro Screen Music Credit: Title: Laszlo - Supernova Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKfxmFU3lWY iTunes Download Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/supernova/id936805712 Artist Link: https://soundcloud.com/laszlomusic Outro Screen Music Credit: Approaching Nirvana - Sugar High http://www.youtube.com/approachingnirvana Sound effects provided by http://www.freesfx.co.uk/sfx/
Views: 369154 Linus Tech Tips
ThinkPad X40 - IBM's first ultralight X-Pad restored & SSD
 
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Review IBM ThinkPad X40 - IBM's first ultralight 12" X-Pad laptop restored & SSD with an IDE-msata adapter. Donation Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/PanoramaChannel
Views: 1041 Panorama as a circle
Walmart's food safety solution using IBM Food Trust built on the IBM Blockchain Platform
 
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Frank Yiannas, Walmart's Vice President of Food Safety, explains how Walmart can track food products through its supply chain using IBM Food Trust built on the IBM Blockchain Platform. LINKS Learn more about IBM Food Trust: https://ibm.co/2mKeEgL What is blockchain?: https://ibm.co/2LTu2Cb #Blockchain #SupplyChain #Sustainability
Views: 97014 IBMBlockchain
1984 IBM Product Center commercial.
 
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1984 IBM Product Center commercial.
Views: 243 Jason Harder
IBM Tape History - Session 1: Tape Media Part 2
 
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Interviewed by Tom Gardner on 2015-10-12 in Tucson AZ X7617.2016 © Computer History Museum This is session one of five sessions held in Tucson, AZ, regarding IBM’s tape storage history. The five sessions are: 1. Tape Media (CHM catalog number: 102737991) 2. Overview of tape products and product management (CHM catalog number: 102737993) 3. 3480 tape drive (CHM catalog number: 102738020) 4. Linear Tape Open (LTO) Consortium (CHM catalog number: 102738022) 5. Recovery of tapes damaged in Challenger disaster (CHM catalog number: 102738024). IBM’s tape development began in the late 1940s in the Kenyon Mansion, Poughkeepsie, NY, (later IBM’s management training site) and moved to the then new Poughkeepsie lab in 1954. The first production units shipped in 1952. In 1965 production and development moved to Boulder, Colorado, then from Boulder to San Jose, California in 1973 and then back to Boulder in 1977 . Its movement to Tucson, Arizona, was announced that same year and began in 1978. IBM Tucson was responsible for a number of tape innovations including the 3480 tape drive and cartridge and the consortium that led to the LTO standard. Employment in Tucson peaked in the mid-1980s at more than 5,000. Production was ended at Tucson in the late 1980s. New media product development ended in 1988. New tape drive development ended in the mid-1990s. As of 2016 IBM in Tucson continued to participate in tape standards development as a part of the LTO Consortium as well as managing IBM storage products . This session on media is primarily focused on the development of the chromium dioxide media first introduced by IBM for the 3480 tape drive; however it includes information on the earlier reel-to-reel tape media as well as the 3850 Mass Storage media. * Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further information - http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102737992 Visit computerhistory.org/collections/oralhistories/ for more information about the Computer History Museum's Oral History Collection. Lot number: X7617.2016 Catalog number: 102737991
IBM Design Studio Austin
 
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On Nov 6, 2013, IBM opens the first half of a 50,000 product design studio, located on the IBM Austin campus. From this studio, IBM will transform how the company designs software, including applications and solutions for big data, cloud, mobile and social software. This new space is built for direct collaboration, bringing together designers, developers and product managers to help IBM revolutionize its approach to software design and the way users develop and interact with software.
Views: 22126 IBM for CIO
How It Works: Design Thinking
 
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Trying to solve a problem or find better ways of getting work done? Get familiar with IBM Design Thinking and Agile. For more information on IBM Design Thinking, please visit: http://www.ibm.com/design IBMers -- learn more about Security Intelligence on Think Academy (internal site): https://ibm.biz/IBMThinkAcademy
Views: 606276 IBM Think Academy
IBM RXN for Chemistry
 
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The first AI web service for predicting chemical reactions in the IBM Cloud. Try it today: http://rxn.res.ibm.com “Found in Translation”: Predicting Outcomes of Complex Organic Chemistry Reactions using Neural Sequence-to-Sequence Models, Philippe Schwaller, Théophile Gaudin, Dávid Lányi, Costas Bekas, Teodoro Laino https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2018/sc/c8sc02339e
Views: 575 IBM Research
SCAMP - The 1st IBM personal computer; the missing link in the PC's past!
 
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http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=68174004&trk=tab_pro This is a little known story of how two relatively unknown IBM labs in California's Silicon Valley collaborated in 1973 to create a portable personal computer called SCAMP which helped change all of our lives. Narrated by Paul Friedl, the inventor of SCAMP, this is a brief story of how SCAMP came about and helped begin the Personal Computing Era. This video includes the brief comments in 1988 of J. B. Eklund, Curator, Division of Computers, Information & Society of the National Museum of American History, as he accepts SCAMP for membership in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institute. The video then briefly describes the path from the "personal computing" concept, to the building of the SCAMP operational prototype, to the final demonstration to the President of IBM and his decision which led IBM to develop the 51XX product line of IBM Personal Computers. The story ends by introducing the key people who made SCAMP happen.
Views: 7290 Paul Friedl
Build your First IoT Application with IBM Watson IoT
 
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Watch this webinar recording to learn how to build your first connected application. I will walk you through the key steps involved in building your first IoT application in the cloud with IBM Watson IoT. At the end of the session, you will gain an understanding of registering devices and sending messages to the cloud via MQTT.
Views: 9167 Janakiram MSV
IBM 151 | How to Choose the Ideal Product to Sell Online
 
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http://www.internet-based-business-mastery.com In this episode of http://www.internetbusinessmastery.com ,we talk about how to choose the best product to sell online. And in the quick tip, we share a brilliant tool that will save you tons of time answering business e-mails..Visit http://www.freeaudiogift.com to get immediate access to your 30 Day, no risk, trial membership to Internet Business Mastery Academy, where you will get full access to ALL of our courses, tools, and resources for creating your own internet business and escaping the 9-to-5.You will have access to the internet business courses, a Grill the Guru interviews, Success Book Summaries, Cubicle Escape Interviews, Checklists, and new video tutorials in the Million Dollar Rolodex.
IBM Lotus R5 Commercial (1999)
 
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IBM Lotus R5 commercial from 1999. Lotus Software (called Lotus Development Corporation before its acquisition by IBM) was an American software company based in Massachusetts. Lotus is most commonly known for the Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet application, the first feature-heavy, user-friendly, reliable and WYSIWYG-enabled product to become widely available in the early days of the IBM PC, when there was no graphical user interface. Much later, in conjunction with Ray Ozzie's Iris Associates, Lotus also released a groupware and email system, Lotus Notes. IBM purchased the company in 1995 for US$3.5 billion, primarily to acquire Lotus Notes and to establish a presence in the increasingly important client–server computing segment, which was rapidly making host-based products such as IBM's OfficeVision obsolete.
Views: 437 PastMeetsPresent
VirtualViewer® HTML5 for IBM
 
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Take your viewing to the next level with Snowbound's VirtualViewer® HTML5 for IBM—the first and best document viewer for IBM Content Navigator & IBM's ECM product family, including Case Manager, FileNet (P8), CM8 Content Manager, CMIS and CMOD. Learn more at Snowbound.com
Views: 206 Snowbound Software
The Lost 1984 Video: young Steve Jobs introduces the Macintosh
 
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The Original 1984 Macintosh Introduction: the magic moment, when Steve Jobs unveils the Macintosh and releases it from its bag. We've found these historical lost videos in 2004 and restored and published them to the world on January 24., 2005, when the Mac became 21 years old. Read the story of this wonderful discovery here: http://www.mac-essentials.de/index.php/mac/14276/ Uploaded by TextLab, the original discoverers and restorers.
Views: 5129325 macessentials
Your first steps with IBM Lotus Notes
 
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For further informations visit: http://workflow-by-moacyr.blogspot.com Demo - Your first steps with IBM Lotus Notes IBM Lotus Notes 8 showcases a modern, Web-like look-and-feel. Updated to help you work smarter, the new user interface presents the tools you need, when and where you need them. It's visually appealing, highly consistent and feature rich. That means you get your job done faster, and easier. And, you enjoy it along the way.
Views: 293911 moadoors
IBM Digital Twin: Designing for a connected, software-driven world
 
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From the Genius of Things Summit in Boston, October 4th, 2017 Speaker: Dibbe Edwards, Vice President, IBM Watson IoT Connected Products Offering Management, Delivery and Support Learn more: http://ibm.co/DigitalTwin & http://ibm.com/iot
IBM Tape History - Session 4: LTO Virtual Company Panel Part 2
 
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Interviewed by Tom Gardner on 2015-10-15 in Tucson AZ X7617.2016 © Computer History Museum This is session four of five sessions held in Tucson, AZ, regarding IBM’s tape storage history. The five sessions are: 1. Tape Media (CHM catalog number: 102737991) 2. Overview of tape products and product management (CHM catalog number: 102737993) 3. 3480 tape drive (CHM catalog number: 102738020) 4. Linear Tape Open (LTO) Consortium (CHM catalog number: 102738022) 5. Recovery of tapes damaged in Challenger disaster (CHM catalog number: 102738024). See IBM Tape History Session 1: Media for an overview of IBM Tucson. This session is about the Linear Tape Open consortium organized by HP, IBM and Seagate beginning 1997. * Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further information - http://www.computerhistory.org/collections/catalog/102738023 Visit computerhistory.org/collections/oralhistories/ for more information about the Computer History Museum's Oral History Collection. Lot number: X7684.2016 Catalog number: 102738022
5 Predictions for IBM Power9
 
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As you would expect, the release of the Power9 has generated a lot of excitement in the market. We’re certainly excited to get our hands on it and see what it can do. In this video, we’re going to look at the new Power9 in a bit more detail, outline its potential, and give the top 5 things we’re excited about. Power Systems have been around for a long time; for a while it was the de facto compute engine for all of business. IBM even dabbled in the consumer market for a time, with Power chips showing up in gaming consoles and even Apple Macs. But, it has always remained, at its core, a product for business transactions and processing. On a chip-per-chip basis, IBM Power Systems have almost always had a performance and price-performance lead on other comparable chips. But, now that Power8 has been around for three years, the time for an update has come. Let’s get the nitty-gritty out of the way first. Power9 chips come in two flavors, SU -- for “scale up” -- and SO -- for “scale out.” Each flavor has a version with 24 cores and a version with 12, meaning there’s essentially four products here. As of now, the SU are available in the first quarter of 2018, with the rest of the release schedule subject to change. As you can imagine, IBM is putting a lot of its energy in the Power Linux space, in order to build ecosystems, drive workloads, build more adoption, and advance technologies in high-end, scalable databases like SAP HANA, and in scale-out databases like MongoDB and Redis. These are, after all where Power Systems shines. High performance computing, or HPC, is another key area for Power9. Applications solving problems and running scientific models that need thousands of compute nodes, cranking constantly, are a real sweet spot. Power9 is reportedly 30 percent faster than previous generations. In high performance computing, that may mean you can buy 7,000 units instead of 10,000 -- that’s real cost savings, and presents far fewer points of failure. Of course, no Power9 discussion would be complete without mentioning artificial intelligence and cognitive. IBM is doing a lot of work to make Power9 and Power Linux the platform of choice for AI and cognitive workloads. This is for good reason; just like HPC, they are also typically very compute intensive, so it’s a good fit. AI and cognitive users commonly use GPUs to complement CPUs to do those very iterative machine learning sets of tasks. As we’ve mentioned, these are areas where Power Systems technology shines, has great background, and provides lots of point of failure advantages. This GPU versus CPU concept is a big one. It was nowhere on the radar a few years ago. But as video stock has exploded, the adoption of GPU tech for mainstream compute workloads has become very much a reality in the marketplace, and far sooner than anyone expected. Power9 is ready for these workloads, though. With its NV Link, the throughput between the GPU and the rest of the components in the system is 80 gigabytes per second, compared to 16 gigabytes per second on PCIe. For AI, machine learning, and anything along those lines that uses GPUs to process data, it's a huge performance difference. Now that we’ve looked at some use cases, let’s get to the fun -- OK and a little nerdy -- stuff: five new things we’re particularly excited about. Up first, we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention that Power9 sees a die shrink to 14 manometers. This means better, raw chip core performance, end of story. If you have a single set of applications, data will process faster just because things are closer and the clock is a little faster. Second, the bandwidth between the chip and the memory is dramatically expanded compared to Intel and previous generations. And that memory bandwidth is a big deal. It’s DDR4 now instead of DDR3, and the combination of those things will improve performance and improve price-performance. It’s hard to believe that we got to number three before mentioning the Open Power Foundation. It started with IBM allowing 3rd party board makers to build a board that would work with the Power8 chip. The company has pushed it a bit further for Power9... For more information on Key Information Systems and IBM's partnership, please visit https://www.keyinfo.com/partners/ibm/ Subscribe to our Blog: https://www.keyinfo.com/about/blog/ Follow us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/510527?trk=tyah Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KeyInfo/ Like us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_keyinfo_
Views: 4957 keyinfosys
IBM Cloud Private for Data - Quick Product Walkthrough
 
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IBM Cloud Private for Data is a single, unified data platform that accelerates your preparedness for AI. Watch the short product walkthrough to learn more about how to get started with this robust platform. To learn more, visit: https://ibm.co/2vqT59C.
Views: 447 IBM Analytics
IBM Watson Health Partner: Welltok
 
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CaféWell is a product or service of Welltok and is licensed solely under Welltok’s license or provided under Welltok’s terms and conditions. IBM and Welltok are separate companies and each is responsible for its own products and services. Neither IBM nor Welltok makes any warranties, express or implied, concerning the others’ products or services.
Views: 318 IBM Watson Health
IBM Watson Workspace – Team collaboration with the power of Watson
 
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Introducing IBM Watson Workspace: the first team collaboration app built with AI at its core. Watch how teams do their best work, from anywhere, on any device, by leveraging the power of Watson to help cut through the noise and increase productivity. Check out our latest product updates: https://ibm.biz/BdZW8E or visit the Watson Workspace page: https://ibm.com/watsonworkspace
Views: 5039 IBM Social Business
The Making of IBM: Amazing Revelations and Character Lessons That Resonate Today (2003)
 
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Thomas John Watson Sr. (1874–1956) was an American businessman. He served as the chairman and CEO of International Business Machines (IBM) and oversaw the company's growth into an international force from 1914 to 1956. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0471414638/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0471414638&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=77bff5d72df4013805e0d41b2a2b2f1d Watson developed IBM's management style and corporate culture from John Henry Patterson's training at NCR. He turned the company into a highly-effective selling organization, based largely on punched card tabulating machines. A leading self-made industrialist, he was one of the richest men of his time and was called the world's greatest salesman when he died in 1956. Thomas J. Watson was the only son of Thomas and Jane Fulton White Watson. His four older siblings were all girls —Jennie, Effie, Loua, and Emma. His father farmed and owned a modest lumber business located near Painted Post, a few miles west of Elmira, in the Southern Tier region of New York.[6] Thomas worked on the family farm in East Campbell, New York and attended the District School Number Five in the late 1870s.[7] As Watson entered his teen years he attended Addison Academy In Addison, New York.[6] Having given up his first job—teaching—after just one day, Watson took a year's course in accounting and business at the Miller School of Commerce in Elmira. He left the school in 1891, taking a job at $6 a week as bookkeeper for Clarence Risley's Market in Painted Post. One year later he joined a traveling salesman, George Cornwell, peddling organs and pianos around the farms for William Bronson's local hardware store, Watson's first sales job. When Cornwell left, Watson continued alone, earning $10 per week. After two years of this life, he realized he would be earning $70 per week if he were on a commission. His indignation on making this discovery was such that he quit and moved from his familiar surroundings to the relative metropolis of Buffalo.[6] Watson then spent a very brief period selling sewing machines for Wheeler and Wilcox. According to Tom Watson, Jr., in his autobiography: One day my dad went into a roadside saloon to celebrate a sale and had too much to drink. When the bar closed, he found that his entire rig—horse, buggy, and samples—had been stolen. Wheeler and Wilcox fired him and dunned him for the lost property. Word got around, of course, and it took Dad more than a year to find another steady job.[8] Watson would later enforce strict rules at IBM against alcohol consumption, even off the job. According to Tom Jr.: This anecdote never made it into IBM lore, which is too bad, because it would have helped explain Father to the tens of thousands of people who had to follow his rules.[8] Watson's next job was peddling shares of the Buffalo Building and Loan Company for a huckster named C. B. Barron, a showman renowned for his disreputable conduct, which Watson, as a lifelong Methodist, deplored. Barron absconded with the commission and the loan funds. Next Watson opened a butcher shop in Buffalo, which soon failed, leaving Watson with no money, no investment, and no job. Watson had a newly acquired NCR cash register in his butcher shop, for which he had to arrange transfer of the installment payments to the new owner of the butcher shop. On visiting NCR, he met John J. Range and asked him for a job. Determined to join the company, he repeatedly called on Range until, after a number of abortive attempts, he finally was hired in November, 1896, as sales apprentice to Range. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_J._Watson
Views: 2119 The Film Archives
Configure and Run an Application Security Scan with IBM Security AppScan Standard
 
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In this brief demonstration video, you'll learn how to configure and run a basic scan in IBM Security AppScan Standard, our leading application security testing solution. You'll also learn how AppScan Standard identifies and prioritizes vulnerabilities in your organization's applications, in order for you to remediate them more quickly and effectively. To learn more, visit http://ibm.co/1L4jQ8f A free trial of AppScan Standard is available here: http://ibm.co/1nhyL3a
Views: 13528 IBM Security

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