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Search results “Oracle diagnostic pack standard”
Performance monitoring for Oracle Standard Edition
 
21:31
Performance monitoring for Oracle Standard Edition or Enterprise Edition without diagnostics pack. This done without any data stored on the monitored host, and without any code or objects created on the monitored hosts
Views: 172 foldingbike123
55/125 Oracle PLSQL: Working with Packages / Overloading Standard Program
 
07:17
تعلم اوراكل حتى الاحتراف Learn Oracle PLSQL EXAM 1Z0-144
Views: 737 khaled alkhudari
Oracle Standard Edition and Standard Edition One
 
01:50
http://zerotoprotraining.com Oracle Standard Edition and Standard Edition One Features Category: Database Tags: Oracle Standard Edition, Oracle Standard Edition One
Views: 687 HandsonERP
Compression Options for Oracle Database
 
36:49
Held on August 9 2018 This session by Gregg Christman focuses on general questions and insights regarding Oracle Basic Compression, Oracle OLTP Table Compression and Oracle Advanced Row Compression. Here is a quick guide to the highlights: 2:25 Basic vs. Advanced Row Compression comparison 4:55 Should you expect the same compression ratio with Basic and Advanced Row Compression? 8:29 Should you compress all tables and partitions? 15:50 What is the overhead associated with Advanced Row Compression? 17:06 Do I need to change my application to use compression? 17:31 Who uses Advanced Row Compression? 18:35 Is there any ongoing administration with Advanced Row Compression 20:43 When does updated data get compressed? 26:30 What role does PCTFREE play in updates and compression? 28:44 Does Advanced Row Compression work with Oracle Encryption? 29:34 Does enabling compression online or offline make a difference? 31:38 What are the typical compression ratios with Basic and Advanced Row Compression? 32:56 Are there any suggested MOS notes related to compression? 34:12 Feedback about ACO from customers AskTOM Office Hours offers free, monthly training and tips on how to make the most of Oracle Database, from Oracle product managers, developers and evangelists. https://asktom.oracle.com/ Oracle Developers portal: https://developer.oracle.com/ Sign up for an Oracle Cloud trial: https://cloud.oracle.com/en_US/tryit music: bensound.com
Views: 677 Oracle Developers
Oracle Enterprise Manager Management Pack Demo
 
05:24
Tim George demo OEM management pack and how to create users.
Views: 148 Blue Medora
Applying PSU patch on 12c database
 
16:28
This video is to mention high levels steps for applying PSU patch on 12c database. For actual steps, always refer to README file which is provided with patch
Views: 17881 Pavan dba
Oracle Enterprise Manager License
 
00:24
Video of a situation where a client wants to restrict himself from having access to Oracle Enterprise Management Packs. As a result, the Oracle checkbox triggers a 'License Agreed' checkbox that cannot be undone. When audited, most customers will be pushed to pay for the packs.
Views: 334 Daniel Hesselink
Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c: Use and Report on Out-of-the-Box Compliance Standards
 
09:42
This demonstration shows you how to benefit from the out-of-the-box compliance standards capabilities of Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c. You see how to validate the configuration of your targets against Oracle best practices. Copyright © 2012 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle® is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the "Materials"). The Materials are provided "as is" without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Oracle Enterprise Edition: When Nice to Have becomes a Necessity
 
57:14
If you're currently running Oracle Standard Edition and considering the possibility of upgrading to Enterprise Edition, this presentation is for you. Our Oracle expert discusses the fundamental features and benefits of Enterprise Edition and how they may align with your business objectives. Presented by: Arman Rawls, Senior Oracle Database Architect at Neovera. Learn more about Neovera's Oracle database services and expertise - https://www.neovera.com/content/database-services/oracle-dba-services/.
Views: 132 Neovera
Oracle 11g Enterprise Manager and LogMiner interface
 
04:42
The most important use of LogMiner may be to find out "who" did "what." Like, If you don't have auditing enabled for performance reasons, or just haven't kept the audit records, all you have to do is to search for the clues in the LogMiner interface by mining the redo logs—online as well as archived ones. Starting from Oracle Database 11g, it is now possible to access LogMiner from EM. Such feature makes LogMiner extremely powerful tool. Of course, DBMS_LOGMINER package is there as before.
Views: 8599 CLEO & CUQUIN
Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c: Console Overview and Customization
 
07:04
This demonstration shows you the key components of the Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c console, and how to customize the console to enable you to use it most effectively. Copyright © 2012 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle® is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the "Materials"). The Materials are provided "as is" without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c: Service Dashboard
 
08:45
Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Release 2: Service Dashboard
PL/SQL tutorial 16: Table Auditing using DML Triggers in Oracle PL/SQL
 
09:55
Learn Table Auditing using DML Triggers in Oracle Database and Increase the level of security by keep an eye on user tempering your table data. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog : http://bit.ly/table-auditing Previous Tutorial ► DML Triggers with Examples https://youtu.be/-OR7zLzCh_I ► Select-Into Statement: https://youtu.be/F5eMJhwmCQs ►Sysdate Blog : http://bit.ly/sysdate-in-oracle-by-rebellionrider ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Let's Get Free Uber Cab◄◄◄ Use Referral Code UberRebellionRider and get $20 free for your first ride. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ http://rebellionrider.tumblr.com/ http://www.pinterest.com/rebellionrider/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 77891 Manish Sharma
PL/SQL: Ref cursor Types
 
07:57
In this tutorial, you'll learn the types of ref cursors.. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 13041 radhikaravikumar
Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c: What's New in BIP and How To Setup BIP Security
 
06:25
Starts with a brief overview of what's new with BI Publisher and Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c before looking at the BIP Security model, and how to setup BIP Security for EMCC13c. To improve the video quality, click the gear icon and set the Quality to 1080p/720p HD. ================================= For more information, see http://www.oracle.com/goto/oll Copyright © 2016 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Oracle Database 12c: Creating a Unified Audit Policy
 
04:25
Overview and demo of using a unified audit policy to audit database behaviors, database components, and database users. "Monitoring Database Activity with Auditing" in Oracle Database Security Guide: http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=db121&id=CCHEHCGI "Auditing Database Activity" in Oracle Database 2 Day + Security Guide: http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=db121&id=BCGGIAIC "Keeping Your Oracle Database Secure" in Oracle Database Security Guide: http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=db121&id=CHDCEBFA
Views: 2716 OracleDBVision
Performance Anti-Patterns: Non-query DML inside loops
 
14:03
Lots of code follows patterns. Some of the patterns are good ones, some them are bad - and these we call "anti-patterns." In this video, Steven identifies a common and, for many, surprising anti-pattern - and then shows how to turn it into a design pattern worthy of use. The anti-pattern is the execution on non-query DML (inserts, updates, deletes) inside a loop. The refactored positive design is based on bulk processing in PL/SQL. Along the way, Steven shows how this involves moving from row-by-row to phased processing. ================================================== Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Oracle Database 12c Release 1(12.1.0.2.0) Installation On Linux
 
24:46
This installation shows Step By Step Instructions on how to install Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux6 . Get the scripts of this Video on https://reginankemchor.blogspot.com/2016/08/how-install-oracle-database-12c-on-linux.html By Regina
Views: 8431 regina nkemchor
PL/SQL: Mutating Triggers Part-1
 
06:24
In this tutorial, you'll learn... PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 25310 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Brief on Associative Arrays
 
10:52
In this tutorial, you'll learn the points to be noted on AA PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 6960 radhikaravikumar
How to create and monitor scheduled jobs in Oracle
 
14:49
This oracle tutorial has a basic information to create a scheduled job in Oracle database 12c. Along with viewing properties of the scheduler and monitoring schduler.
Views: 9931 Subhroneel Ganguly
PL/SQL: Collections Part-3
 
10:27
In this tutorial, you'll learn you'll learn the continuity of previous collection video. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 7255 radhikaravikumar
Examples on Oracle Database Auditing |  Oracle Database Security | auditing in oracle 11g
 
21:15
This is the part of the series "Oracle DBA Videos" on Oracle Database Security. The following topics are covered in practical -- General idea about database auditing -- Statement level auditing -- Privilege level auditing -- Object level auditing
Views: 13348 Wysheid Wysheid
SQL: WITH Clause
 
06:11
In this tutorial, you'll learn will learn how to use with clause PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 16034 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Dynamic SQL part-2
 
05:14
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is dynamic SQL and how to implement it.. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database.
Views: 17666 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Ref Cursors
 
09:28
In this tutorial, you'll learn what is ref cursors. PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 28360 radhikaravikumar
Oracle PL/SQL Tutorials | Package Overloading | by Mr.Vaman Deshmukh
 
09:36
Oracle PL/SQL Tutorials | Package Overloading | by Mr.Vaman Deshmukh ** For Online Training Registration: https://goo.gl/r6kJbB ► Call: +91-8179191999 ► Visit Our Website for Classroom Training: https://nareshit.in ► For Online Training: https://nareshit.com/ -------------------------- ► About NareshIT: "Naresh IT is having 14+ years of experience in software training industry and the best Software Training Institute for online training, classroom training, weekend training, corporate training of Hadoop, Salesforce, AWS, DevOps, Spark, Data Science, Python, Tableau, RPA ,Java, C#.NET, ASP.NET, Oracle, Testing Tools, Silver light, Linq, SQL Server, Selenium, Android, iPhone, C Language, C++, PHP and Digital Marketing in USA,Hyderabad, Chennai and Vijayawada,Bangalore India which provides online training across all the locations -------------------------- ► Our Online Training Features: 1.Training with Real-Time Experts 2.Industry Specific Scenario’s 3.Flexible Timings 4.Soft Copy of Material 5. Share Videos of each and every session. -------------------------- Please write back to us at [email protected]/[email protected] or Call us at USA: +1404-232-9879 or India: +918179191999 ** Check The Below Links** ► For Course Reg: https://goo.gl/r6kJbB ► Subscribe to Our Channel: https://goo.gl/q9ozyG ► Circle us on G+: https://plus.google.com/NareshIT ► Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NareshIT ► Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/nareshitech ► Follow us on Linkedin: https://in.linkedin.com/company/naresh-i-technologies ► Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nareshitech/
EuroTcl 2017: HammerDB, load testing and benchmarking databases with Tcl/Tk (Steve Shaw)
 
26:23
HammerDB is a graphical open source database load testing and benchmarking tool hosted on sourceforge. Originally called Hammerora for Oracle Database this tool has grown to support Microsoft SQL Server, IBM DB2, MySQL, PostgreSQL and others with pre-compiled packages available for Windows and Linux platforms. Written in Tcl using Tcl database extensions and TDBC, HammerDB has become the industry standard tool for simulating industry standard database benchmarks with hundreds of published white papers and benchmarks. This session introduces HammerDB from a Tcl development perspective and in particular how the Tcl threading model has enabled the building of an application that drives database performance to many millions of transactions per minute. It covers how Tcl is used to build database schemas, run and monitor workloads and capture and analyse performance metrics. Details are given on the Tcl extensions and packages used and any modifications made as well as the development challenges of growing from working with one database to multiple database platforms. Looking ahead there are plans to add support for additional databases and workloads with many new Tcl database extensions now available.
Views: 1566 Tcl/Tk Video
Oracle Audit Vault & Database Firewall
 
03:13
Como mejorar la seguridad de cualquier base de datos y facilitar los procesos de cumplimiento de regulaciones con Oracle Audit vault
Views: 3450 Ivan Felipe Gzavhon
Oracle Diagnostic Log Analyzer - ADF Requests and the JSF Lifecycle
 
48:57
In this ADF Insider Chris Muir investigates the ADF Request Analyzer, a tool within JDeveloper's Oracle Diagnostic Log Analyzer which is designed to help you understand the runtime behaviour of your program, including looking under the covers of the JSF & ADF Lifecycle. The ADF Request Analyzer is therefore an excellent debugging aid in assisting developers with building their ADF applications.
Views: 4923 ADFInsiderEssentials
Oracle Data Masking
 
17:40
In this Demo Oracle Data Masking is used to obfuscate data from a production database so that it can be used in non-production environments. This will make sure that business critical data does not end up in a less secure environments, which could potentially lead to data breaches.
Views: 4562 Frank van der Borden
GTA IV - Car Tuning #4 - Oracle
 
03:10
GTA IV - Car Tuning #4 - Oracle
Views: 925 Wild Duck
ORACLE WORLD - Materialized view Part #1st
 
09:39
Hello friends in this video i'm giving you Introduction of Materialized view, why we use it and what is the advantage of MV. Oracle database Unbeatable,Unbreakable Platform.. #ORACLEWORLD #Materializedview By Lalit saini
Views: 7188 Oracle World
PL/SQL: Brief on V-arrays
 
03:35
In this tutorial, you'll learn the points to be noted on V-arrays PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 4103 radhikaravikumar
PL/SQL: Without using Length function
 
06:22
In this tutorial, you'll learn how to get the length of a string PL/SQL (Procedural Language/Structured Query Language) is Oracle Corporation's procedural extension for SQL and the Oracle relational database. PL/SQL is available in Oracle Database (since version 7), TimesTen in-memory database (since version 11.2.1), and IBM DB2 (since version 9.7).[1] Oracle Corporation usually extends PL/SQL functionality with each successive release of the Oracle Database. PL/SQL includes procedural language elements such as conditions and loops. It allows declaration of constants and variables, procedures and functions, types and variables of those types, and triggers. It can handle exceptions (runtime errors). Arrays are supported involving the use of PL/SQL collections. Implementations from version 8 of Oracle Database onwards have included features associated with object-orientation. One can create PL/SQL units such as procedures, functions, packages, types, and triggers, which are stored in the database for reuse by applications that use any of the Oracle Database programmatic interfaces. PL/SQL works analogously to the embedded procedural languages associated with other relational databases. For example, Sybase ASE and Microsoft SQL Server have Transact-SQL, PostgreSQL has PL/pgSQL (which emulates PL/SQL to an extent), and IBM DB2 includes SQL Procedural Language,[2] which conforms to the ISO SQL’s SQL/PSM standard. The designers of PL/SQL modeled its syntax on that of Ada. Both Ada and PL/SQL have Pascal as a common ancestor, and so PL/SQL also resembles Pascal in several aspects. However, the structure of a PL/SQL package does not resemble the basic Object Pascal program structure as implemented by a Borland Delphi or Free Pascal unit. Programmers can define public and private global data-types, constants and static variables in a PL/SQL package.[3] PL/SQL also allows for the definition of classes and instantiating these as objects in PL/SQL code. This resembles usage in object-oriented programming languages like Object Pascal, C++ and Java. PL/SQL refers to a class as an "Abstract Data Type" (ADT) or "User Defined Type" (UDT), and defines it as an Oracle SQL data-type as opposed to a PL/SQL user-defined type, allowing its use in both the Oracle SQL Engine and the Oracle PL/SQL engine. The constructor and methods of an Abstract Data Type are written in PL/SQL. The resulting Abstract Data Type can operate as an object class in PL/SQL. Such objects can also persist as column values in Oracle database tables. PL/SQL is fundamentally distinct from Transact-SQL, despite superficial similarities. Porting code from one to the other usually involves non-trivial work, not only due to the differences in the feature sets of the two languages,[4] but also due to the very significant differences in the way Oracle and SQL Server deal with concurrency and locking. There are software tools available that claim to facilitate porting including Oracle Translation Scratch Editor,[5] CEITON MSSQL/Oracle Compiler [6] and SwisSQL.[7] The StepSqlite product is a PL/SQL compiler for the popular small database SQLite. PL/SQL Program Unit A PL/SQL program unit is one of the following: PL/SQL anonymous block, procedure, function, package specification, package body, trigger, type specification, type body, library. Program units are the PL/SQL source code that is compiled, developed and ultimately executed on the database. The basic unit of a PL/SQL source program is the block, which groups together related declarations and statements. A PL/SQL block is defined by the keywords DECLARE, BEGIN, EXCEPTION, and END. These keywords divide the block into a declarative part, an executable part, and an exception-handling part. The declaration section is optional and may be used to define and initialize constants and variables. If a variable is not initialized then it defaults to NULL value. The optional exception-handling part is used to handle run time errors. Only the executable part is required. A block can have a label. Package Packages are groups of conceptually linked functions, procedures, variables, PL/SQL table and record TYPE statements, constants, cursors etc. The use of packages promotes re-use of code. Packages are composed of the package specification and an optional package body. The specification is the interface to the application; it declares the types, variables, constants, exceptions, cursors, and subprograms available. The body fully defines cursors and subprograms, and so implements the specification. Two advantages of packages are: Modular approach, encapsulation/hiding of business logic, security, performance improvement, re-usability. They support object-oriented programming features like function overloading and encapsulation. Using package variables one can declare session level (scoped) variables, since variables declared in the package specification have a session scope.
Views: 2234 radhikaravikumar
demo of dbvisit replicate online migration
 
10:01
Shows how an online Oracle migration from Enterprise Edition (with partitioned tables) to Standard Edition database looks like. Part of blog article on http://ronr.blogspot.nl/2012/08/copy-schema-with-partitioning-online-to.html
Views: 147 Ronald Rood
Oracle - Packages
 
13:48
Oracle - Packages
Views: 8061 Chris Ostrowski
Oracle Database tutorials 1: How to install Oracle Database 11g on windows 7
 
08:54
How To install Oracle Database 11g enterprise edition On windows 7 64 bit. Full installation in Single video. Enjoy SQL and Oracle Database Download Oracle Database 11g from here http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/enterprise-edition/downloads/112010-win64soft-094461.html ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Related Tutorial ► Tut 16 How To Uninstall Oracle 11g http://youtu.be/pk-E-QxWe38 ► Tut 25 How To Install Oracle 11g XE r2 http://youtu.be/-13SbeDavwk ► Oracle 12c Tut 1 How To Install Oracle 12c http://youtu.be/T-rCbe1MMG4 ►Oracle 12c Tut 5 How To Uninstall Oracle 12c http://youtu.be/lyN9aJfMlzQ ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Help Me In Getting A Job◄◄◄ ►Help Me In Getting A Good Job By Connecting With Me on My LinkedIn and Endorsing My Skills. All My Contact Info is Down Below. You Can Also Refer Me To Your Company Thanks -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider https://www.facebook.com/TheRebellionRider http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ You can also Email me at [email protected] You can help me in getting a good job by connecting with me on my LinkedIn and Endorsing my Skills. Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 1459794 Manish Sharma
Clone an Existing WebLogic Domain
 
06:53
To improve the video quality, click the gear icon and set the Quality to 720p HD. Welcome to the Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c Demo Series. In this demonstration, I will show how you can use Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c to clone an Oracle Fusion Middleware domain by using an existing domain provisioning profile. By using Enterprise Manager to provision domains from profiles, you ensure that new environments adhere to IT best practices and standards, and also reduce operation costs. This version includes an updated title slide. Copyright © 2014 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle® is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the "Materials"). The Materials are provided "as is" without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Using Virtual Private Database with Oracle Database 12c
 
04:44
This video shows you how to implement a security policy using the application context functionality of Oracle Database 12c. 1. What is FGAC and VPD? 2. Set up for the demo (Create user, application context, package, trigger and grant privileges). 3. Create the package that is used by the security policy to return a predicate. 4. Create a policy and test it. 5. Drop a policy. Recommended after this: * Using VPD Types * Troubleshooting a VPD policy Copyright © 2014 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle® is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the "Materials"). The Materials are provided "as is" without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
2017SharkfestPart1-2   Oracle Network error. Really?
 
16:47
Oracle DB complains of network failure in the applicaiton log file. What could the problem be? Trace file: corp.pcap Don't forget to subscribe if you like Wireshark! And follow me on Twitter: @hansangb
Views: 805 Hansang Bae
Database Performance Analyzer Guided Tour
 
07:37
Learn more: http://slrwnds.com/DPATour This guided tour of the multi-dimensional performance features in SolarWinds Database Performance Analyzer including SQL statements advise, storage I/O, baselines, alerting and DPA's exclusive wait based response time analysis. Database Performance Analyzer is the perfect place to start in order to answer the question 'Why is my application slow'. With an easy to use graphic interface, you can find the cause of a slow query and isolate the root cause, including a correlation with server resources in just 4 clicks. Monitor SQL Server, Oracle, DB2 and Sybase running on physical servers, VMware, and even virtual machines running in the cloud with less than a 1% load. Database Performance Analyzer is both powerful easy to use, facilitating collaborative problem solving throughout IT, including DBAs, developers, managers system and network admins. Connect with SolarWinds: thwack Community: http://thwack.solarwinds.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SolarWinds Twitter: https://twitter.com/solarwinds Google+: https://plus.google.com/+solarwinds/ LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/solarwinds
Views: 36870 solarwindsinc
How to Tune Oracle Data Guard 12c - Tuning, Upgrade, and Migration
 
11:49
Learn how to tune Oracle 12c Data Guard apply process (e.g. parallelize, network tuning), apply rolling patches and perform a zero-downtime upgrade with the DBMS_ROLLING package! And, learn how to use Data Guard for Oracle Database platform migrations.
Views: 507 SkillBuilders
Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c: Use Active Session History (ASH) Analytics
 
03:33
This demonstration shows you how to monitor your database using Active Session History (ASH) Analytics in Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c. Copyright © 2012 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle® is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the "Materials"). The Materials are provided "as is" without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Installation of Oracle Database 12c Software on Oracle Enterprise Linux
 
23:11
Installation of Oracle Database 12c Software on Oracle Enterprise Linux Watch more videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Mr. Parth Panjabi, Tutorials Point India Private Limited
MELODY ORACLE MUSICAL DIVINATION SYSTEM
 
00:24
NOW AVAILABLE HEAR, IT IS: the production version of MELODY ORACLE, the first in a line of musical instruments from A MAGIC PULSEWAVE ESOTERIC ELECTRONICS. HAND-ASSEMBLED IN THE USA. $333 + $15 shipping. Order via email [email protected] MELODY ORACLE is a "musical pattern divination system" AKA "spirit organ" with a game board-style interface, and a MELORHYTHMIC pattern generation method not found on any other sequencer. MELODY ORACLE is rhythmic, logical, and musical, yet is continually surprising and inspiring in its generations. The border of chaos and order. The meeting of known and unknown. MELODY ORACLE can be used standalone as a COSMIC MUSIC RECEIVER, or interfaced as a melodic or rhythmic source in an existing electronic music setup. Tuning is completely variable. The box includes a 14 page graphic instruction manual, a power supply, and 30 solid metal MELORHYTHMIC FUNNELS, used to resonate MELODY ORACLE with the MELORHYTHMIC WAVELENGTHS OF THE UNIVERSE. Two eight-sided dice (included) can be used by any number of players to INVOKE THE ENDLESS SONG OF COSMIC ORDER AND CHAOS. MELODY ORACLE has 8 multiturn fine tuners, a 1/4" audio line out and an "AMP LINK" port for interfacing with future AMP instruments and third-party synthesizer equipment. 9 units are available now for $333 each, and can be shipped in time for the holiday season. We expect to sell out of those. Preorders (with a $111 deposit) will be accepted after that and will be assembled and shipped within one month of the time of order. A built-in speaker version (for more $) and kit version (for less $) are also available. Contact for more info. The next release from AMP ESOTERIC ELECTRONICS will be a breakout box for triggering external/standard synthesizer equipment from MELODY ORACLE. Future harmonic accompaniment, amplification, light, and sound shaping devices are also in the works. YOU ARE A CONDUIT FOR BRINGING THE METAPHYSICAL INTO THE PHYSICAL. THE FOCUSED MIND CRYSTALIZES MATERIAL. LOVE, MAGIC, TRUTH, BEAUTY. Info, user manual, and instructional videos at www.melodyoracle.com
Views: 738 A Magic Pulsewave
What should be the Database block size? - DBPerf Video 15
 
07:44
In this video you will learn about the different block sizes and how it impacts an Oracle database performance. Note: You cannot change the block size after a database is created.... Stay subscribed for updates.... Our Upcoming Online Course Schedule is available in the url below https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qKpKf32Zn_SSvbeDblv2UCjvtHIS1ad2_VXHh2m08yY/edit#gid=0 Reach us at [email protected]
Views: 2862 Ramkumar Swaminathan