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Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century - with Steven Pinker
 
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Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the recycled dogma of style guides with reason and evidence. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Watch the Q&A here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rYAnYXIhL0 In this brand-new talk, introduced by Lord Melvyn Bragg, Steven argues that style still matters: in communicating effectively, in enhancing the spread of ideas, in earning a reader’s trust and, not least, in adding beauty to the world. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster, writer and novelist. He was made a Life Peer (Lord Bragg of Wigton) in 1998. Since then he has hosted over 660 episodes of In Our Time on subjects ranging from Quantum Gravity to Truth. He was presenter of the BBC radio series The Routes of English, a history of the English language. He is currently Chancellor of the University of Leeds Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 499948 The Royal Institution
What your speaking style, like, says about you | Vera Regan | TEDxDublin
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. How we use language - our accent, expressions, and the structure of our sentences - changes from region to region. Vera Regan explains why we should listen to these differences, and why language can act as a cultural barometer. Sociolinguist Vera Regan is a researcher at University College Dublin, and her work explores the relationship between our cultural landscape and our changing language. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 2989351 TEDx Talks
What is STYLE-SHIFTING? What does STYLE-SHIFTING mean? STYLE-SHIFTING meaning & explanation
 
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What is STYLE-SHIFTING? What does STYLE-SHIFTING mean? STYLE-SHIFTING meaning - STYLE-SHIFTING definition - STYLE-SHIFTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Style-shifting is a term in sociolinguistics referring to alternation between styles of speech included in a linguistic repertoire of an individual speaker. As noted by Eckert and Rickford, in sociolinguistic literature terms style and register sometimes have been used interchangeably. Also, various connotations of style are a subject of study in stylistics. Style-shifting is a manifestation of intraspeaker (within-speaker) variation, in contrast with interspeaker (between-speakers) variation. It is a voluntary act which an individual effects in order to respond to or initiate changes in sociolinguistic situation (e.g., interlocutor-related, setting-related, topic-related). William Labov, while conducting sociolinguistic interviews, designated two types of spoken style, casual and formal, and three types of reading style (a reading passage, a word list, and a minimal pair list). Analysing style-shifting Labov postulated that "styles can be arranged along a single dimension, measured by the amount of attention paid to speech" (1972, as quoted in), casual style requiring the least amount of conscious self-monitoring. Such style-shifting is often referred to as responsive (produced in response to normative pressures). In recent developments of stylistic variation analysis scholars such as Allan Bell, Barbara Johnstone, Natalie Schilling-Estes have been focusing on initiative dimension of style-shifting, which occurs when speakers proactively choose among various linguistic resources (e.g. dialectal, archaic or vernacular forms) in order to present themselves in a specific way. In initiative style-shifting speakers actively engage in social practices to construct social meaning.
Views: 3318 The Audiopedia
What Is Style And Language In Literature?
 
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The effect of any text is to a very large extent determined by style. Style, diction, tone, and voice style examples definition literary devices. Style readwritethinkstyle definition and examples of style literary deviceslanguage defined. The analysis of literary style goes back to the study classical rhetoric, as well conventional styles language there are unconventional meaning and in whole object purpose is be meaningful. It can also be described as a voice that readers listen to when they read the work of writer language style. Language and style in our town cliffs notes. Style readwritethink language in literature 2. Htm url? Q webcache. Unit 3 language and style in literary texts. Greek and roman literature fact or fiction? . De intranet englishbasics style01. It varies from author to and depends upon one's syntax, word choice, tone. In its broadest definition, style is the way in which language used (see writing can be defined as a writer writes and it technique an individual author uses his. Open resources for language and style. Stylistics and the linguistic study of literature, 1 volume produced there in 1966 titled essays on style language. As a discipline, it links literary criticism to linguistics. Z in america, the volume style words used to describe writing or speech thesaurusrelating ways of creating effects, especially language and literature is usually considered be province literary writers. Words used to describe writing or speech style synonyms and the five features of effective learn nc. And plays help students develop an ear for language that they can transfer to their writing home literature notes our town and style in was well grounded the classics, particularly areas of poetry revise learn about form, structure robert louis stevenson's dr jekyll mr hyde with bbc bitesize gcse english over a period forty years, geoffrey leech has made notable contributions field literary stylistics, using interplay between linguistic form be described as how author uses elements such words, sentence figurative describe events, ideas. Link cite add to word listlanguage style is defined as the choice of words used by a specific group people when they speak. Avoid clichs, vagueness (language that has more than one equally probable meaning), wordiness, style in literature is the literary element describes ways author uses words author's word choice, sentence structure, figurative language, literature, comprises many devices authors employ to create a hardly matrix of shifting patterns, consolidating and jul 1, 2015 this lesson, you'll learn what means how identify four language analysis overview & examples register or dialect used writing novels, even popular ones, will use for all description narration colloquial form only dialogue, if they it at styling, branch applied linguistics, study interpretation texts regard their linguistic tonal. Style in literature definition, types & examples video lesson literary language wikipedialanguage me
Views: 591 Another Question II
What is Linguistics? | Definition and Branches of Linguistics
 
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What is Linguistics? | Definition and Branches of Linguistics: Linguistics is the scientific study of language, specifically language form, language meaning, and language in context. Linguistics is that particular science which studies the origin, organization, nature and development of language descriptively, historically, comparatively, explicitly and formulates the general rules related to language. Now, let’s discuss some of the branches of linguistics. General linguistics is a study of the phenomena, historical changes, and functions of language without restriction to a particular language or to a particular aspect of language such as phonetics, grammar and stylistics. Descriptive linguistics is the work of objectively analyzing and describing how language is actually used (or how it was used in the past) by a group of people in a speech community. It deals with a particular language in a specific time and in a specific community. Diachronic linguistics is also called historical linguistics. It is the scientific study of language change over time. It studies language change, history of words, history of speech communities and develops general theories about how and why language changes. Comparative linguistics is a branch of historical linguistics that is concerned with comparing languages to establish their historical relatedness. It compares two languages and establishes relationships between them. This comparison is generally done between the languages which are related to each other. Theoretical linguistics studies language to construct theories of their structure and functions. It is not concerned with practical applications. Applied linguistics studies language to apply the concepts and findings of linguistics to practical tasks including English language teaching. It covers both general and descriptive linguistics. Phonetics is a branch of linguistics that comprises the study of the sounds of human speech. It is concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds or sign, their physiological production, acoustic properties, auditory perception, and NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL STATUS. Phonology, on the other hand, is concerned with the abstract and grammatical characterization of systems of sounds or signs. It has traditionally focused largely on the study of the systems of phonemes in particular languages (and therefore used to be also called PHONEMICS or PHONEMATICS. MORPHOLOGY is the study of words, how they are formed, and their relationship to other words in the same language. It analyzes the structure of words and parts of words, such as stems, root words, prefixes, and suffixes. ........................................................................... Sources: www.wikipedia.com Webster Dictionary Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans Image Sources: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com ...................................................................................................... Tags: what is linguistics linguistics definition branches of linguistics define linguistics
Views: 126603 English Literature Hub
Historical Linguistics | Diachronic Linguistics
 
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Historical Linguistics | Diachronic Linguistics: Historical linguistics, also called diachronic linguistics, is the scientific study of language change over time. Principal concerns of historical linguistics include: 1. to describe and account for observed changes in particular languages 2. to reconstruct the pre-history of languages and to determine their relatedness, grouping them into language families (comparative linguistics) 3. to develop general theories about how and why language changes 4. to describe the history of speech communities 5. to study the history of words, i.e. etymology Initially, all modern linguistics was historical in orientation. Even the study of modern dialects involved looking at their origins. Ferdinand de Saussure's distinction between synchronic and diachronic linguistics is fundamental to the present day organization of the discipline. Primacy is accorded to synchronic linguistics, and diachronic linguistics is defined as the study of successive synchronic stages. Saussure's clear demarcation, however, has had both defenders and critics. In linguistics, a synchronic analysis is one that views linguistic phenomena only at a given time, usually the present, though a synchronic analysis of a historical language form is also possible. This may be distinguished from diachronic, which regards a phenomenon in terms of developments through time. Diachronic analysis is the main concern of historical linguistics; however, most other branches of linguistics are concerned with some form of synchronic analysis. The study of language change offers a valuable insight into the state of linguistic representation, and because all synchronic forms are the result of historically evolving diachronic changes, the ability to explain linguistic constructions necessitates a focus on diachronic processes. In practice, a purely synchronic linguistics is not possible for any period before the invention of the gramophone, as written records always lag behind speech in reflecting linguistic developments. Written records are difficult to date accurately before the development of the modern title page. Often dating must rely on contextual historical evidence such as inscriptions, or, modern technology such as carbon dating can be used to ascertain dates of varying accuracy. Also, the work of sociolinguists on linguistic variation has shown synchronic states are not uniform: the speech habits of older and younger speakers differ in ways that point to language change. Synchronic variation is linguistic change in progress. Thanks for watching. Please subscribe to my channel.
[Introduction to Linguistics] (OLD) Word Order, Grammar, and Phrase Structure Rules
 
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In this video we look at word order in languages, grammaticality, prescriptive and descriptive grammar, as well as some basic phrase structure rules. Check out my NEW syntax series on my YouTube channel for more syntax! Visit our website: http://bit.ly/1zBPlvm Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1vWiRxW Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1vWwDRc Hello, welcome to TheTrevTutor. I'm here to help you learn your college courses in an easy, efficient manner. If you like what you see, feel free to subscribe and follow me for updates. If you have any questions, leave them below. I try to answer as many questions as possible. If something isn't quite clear or needs more explanation, I can easily make additional videos to satisfy your need for knowledge and understanding.
Views: 107921 TheTrevTutor
Learning Styles & Multiple Intelligences: Theory Integration
 
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Note: Recent Research has disputed the effectiveness of learning styles: The idea of this video is to take Gardner's Multiple Intelligences and use them as student learning styles, although Gardner specifically says learning styles are NOT multiple intelligences SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL: Help keep me going with a tip or contribution https://paypal.me/frankavella?locale.x=en_US TEACHERSPAYTEACHERS STORE Classroom Posters, Courses, Lessons, Presentations, and More https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Teachings-In-Education TEESPRING IN EDUCATiON Stickers, Dress Down Gear, Phone Cases, Coffee Mugs, and More https://teespring.com/stores/teespring-in-education FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT & ON-SITE TRAININGS CONTACT: [email protected] SOCIAL MEDIA https://www.linkedin.com/in/frank-avella-404b59b5/ https://twitter.com/frank_avella Get your Learning Styles Classroom Posters at TPT Store: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Learning-Styles-Classroom-Posters-Multiple-Intelligences-3557244 Student learning styles and multiple intelligences are described and explored in this video. Seven different learning styles are described in detail and explained fully for teachers and educators in all grade levels and disciplines. This video gives credit to howard gardner and his work on multiple intelligences. The video also explains why multiple intelligences are so important to classroom teachers. The first learning style mentioned is the interpersonal learner also known as the social learner. That is followed by the opposite type of learner, which is the intrapersonal learner, sometimes called the solitary learner. Other learning styles included are kinesthetic (physical), verbal or linguistic, auditory or aural, logical or mathematical, and visual. Definition and theory surrounding multiples intelligences are provided throughout along with with suggestions that educators can make to improve their instruction for these students. Other videos in teachings in education playlists are designed for classroom teachers to learn as much as they can, grow as a teacher, and advance in their career of education.
Views: 85100 Teachings in Education
What is Style?
 
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STYLE: not only we express it through our clothes but through the way we talk, how we move, the car we own, the people we hang around with, the places we go, our tastes and all our communication. Style is the pillar that holds an image, it is the background; It is like the legs of a table, without them, that table just wouldn’t make sense. We must be coherent. We must create a balance between what we are, what we think we are, what we say we are and what we project and communicate. Try to understand this, it is wrong the way we have been taught what style is. It is crucial to understand the core so then we can later own it and become the best version of ourselves! #imcnation #stylesystems #imagedesign #styleconsulting #lifestyle
Views: 499 Style Systems
Q&A - Linguistics, Style and Writing - with Steven Pinker
 
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Watch Steven Pinker's talk here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV5J6BfToSw Steven Pinker and Lord Melvyn Bragg answer questions on the importance of writing well. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the recycled dogma of style guides with reason and evidence. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster, writer and novelist. He was made a Life Peer (Lord Bragg of Wigton) in 1998. Since then he has hosted over 660 episodes of In Our Time on subjects ranging from Quantum Gravity to Truth. He was presenter of the BBC radio series The Routes of English, a history of the English language. He is currently Chancellor of the University of Leeds Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 62794 The Royal Institution
How language shapes the way we think | Lera Boroditsky
 
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There are about 7,000 languages spoken around the world -- and they all have different sounds, vocabularies and structures. But do they shape the way we think? Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky shares examples of language -- from an Aboriginal community in Australia that uses cardinal directions instead of left and right to the multiple words for blue in Russian -- that suggest the answer is a resounding yes. "The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is," Boroditsky says. "Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000." Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Views: 3454498 TED
What is Applied Linguistics? | Definition & History of Applied Linguistics
 
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What is Applied Linguistics? | Definition & History of Applied Linguistics? : Applied linguistics is an interdisciplinary field of linguistics that identifies, investigates, and offers solutions to language-related real-life problems. Some of the academic fields related to applied linguistics are education, psychology, communication research, anthropology, and sociology. The tradition of applied linguistics established itself in part as a response to the narrowing of focus in linguistics with the advent in the late 1950s of generative linguistics, and has always maintained a socially-accountable role, demonstrated by its central interest in language problems. Although the field of applied linguistics started from Europe and the United States, the field rapidly flourished in the international context. Applied linguistics first concerned itself with principles and practices on the basis of linguistics. In the early days, applied linguistics was thought as “linguistics-applied” at least from the outside of the field. In the 1960s, however, applied linguistics was expanded to include language assessment, language policy, and second language acquisition. As early as the 1970s, applied linguistics became a problem-driven field rather than theoretical linguistics, including the solution of language-related problems in the real world. By the 1990s, applied linguistics had broadened including critical studies and multilingualism. Research in applied linguistics was shifted to "the theoretical and empirical investigation of real world problems in which language is a central issue." In the United States, applied linguistics also began narrowly as the application of insights from structural linguistics—first to the teaching of English in schools and subsequently to second and foreign language teaching. The linguistics applied approach to language teaching was promulgated most strenuously by Leonard Bloomfield, who developed the foundation for the Army Specialized Training Program, and by Charles C. Fries, who established the English Language Institute (ELI) at the University of Michigan in 1941. In 1948, the Research Club at Michigan established Language Learning: A Journal of Applied Linguistics, the first journal to bear the term applied linguistics. In the late 1960s, applied linguistics began to establish its own identity as an interdisciplinary field of linguistics concerned with real-world language issues. The new identity was solidified by the creation of the American Association for Applied Linguistics in 1977. ................................................................................................ Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applied_linguistics Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans Image Sources: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com ................................................................................................... Tags: what is applied linguistics applied linguistics definition history of applied linguistics define applied linguistics
Views: 25493 English Literature Hub
SOC101 - Language, Dialect, Variety
 
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This video discusses the different approaches towards language, dialect, and variety. It provides several criteria of language definition as well as numerous problems involved.
9. Linguistics and Literature
 
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Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300) In this lecture on the work of Roman Jakobson, Professor Paul Fry continues his discussion of synchrony and diachrony. The relationships among formalism, semiotics, and linguistics are explored. Claude Levi-Strauss's structural interpretation of the Oedipus myth is discussed in some detail. In order to differentiate Jakobson's poetic functions, Professor Fry analyzes the sentence "It is raining" from six perspectives. Significant attention is paid to the use of diagrams in literary linguistic theory. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Synchrony and Diachrony 06:47 - Chapter 2. The Emergence of Structuralism 11:24 - Chapter 3. The Relationship Between Formalism and Semiotics 17:33 - Chapter 4. Levi-Strauss and the Meaning of the Oedipus Myth 26:19 - Chapter 5. The Poetic Function 32:49 - Chapter 6. Jacobson's Six Functions 43:53 - Chapter 7. Metalanguage and Poetic Function Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
Views: 166300 YaleCourses
Sociolinguistics - the study of variation in language
 
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This video lecture is a part of the course 'An Introduction to English Linguistics' at the University of Neuchâtel. This is session 20, which introduces the topic of sociolinguistics.
Views: 72047 Martin Hilpert
Analyzing spoken conversation
 
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This video lecture is a part of the course 'An Introduction to English Linguistics' at the University of Neuchâtel. This is session 13, in which I discuss the study of spoken conversation.
Views: 15711 Martin Hilpert
Intro to Historical Linguistics: Languages, Dialects & Registers (lesson 1 of 4)
 
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Learn the basics of language history, language families and how languages change over time. This first lesson introduces languages, dialects and registers, and hints at how languages are related (and unrelated) to one another. This is an updated version of an earlier video with the same title. It covers the following concepts: mutual intelligibility, dialects, registers, idiolects, defining language. Part of a series of linguistics courses for language learners. Visit the site for exercises, examples and explanations: http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/historical-linguistics-lessons.php music by Kevin MacLeod
Views: 37545 NativLang
What is the relationship among- Linguistics, Literary Criticism, and Style?
 
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IGNOU Help- ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE-What is the relationship among Linguistics, Literary Criticism, and Style?
Views: 60 Beth Elisa
An Introduction to Cohesion in Academic Writing
 
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In this video for the NUST MISiS Academic Writing Center, English Language Fellow John Kotnarowski provides a brief introduction to the concept of cohesion in academic writing. Defining cohesion as “the grammatical and lexical links within a text”, the video outlines the importance of cohesion in academic writing and offers examples of several useful cohesive devices.
Views: 60977 AWUC
Forensic Linguistic Profiling & What Your Language Reveals About You | Harry Bradford | TEDxStoke
 
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How a forensic analysis of language reveals features of idiolect which can be used to identify criminals and terrorists online. Filmed Dec 2016 at The City of Stoke-on-Trent Sixth Form College. [Cameras (Staffs Uni): Oluseyi A Oluyinka; Giorgia Perini; Bob Straw; Tom Andrews; Ed Walker] [Editor (Staffs Uni): Carl Maddox] Born in Newcastle under Lyme, Harry Bradford was educated at Stoke on Trent Sixth Form College before studying English Literature and Language at Bangor University where he then specialised in Forensic Linguistics for his MSc. He currently works as a freelance Forensic Linguistic Consultant. This involves work on legal cases where the true identity or emotional state of a writer need to be determined. This often involves decoding texts or online posts to work out who wrote them and what their state of mind was at the time. Harry's talk considers the duality of online anonymity and the role that the field of Forensic Linguistics and linguistic profiling can play in shaping the future of the relationship between online discourse and surveillance. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 25466 TEDx Talks
This linguist studied the way Trump speaks for two years. Here’s what she found.
 
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Jennifer Sclafani, a linguist at Georgetown University, says President Trump is a “unique” politician because he doesn’t speak like one. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2qiJ4dy Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/
Views: 1410300 Washington Post
3 Writing Styles - APA, Chicago & MLA (Examrace - Dr. Manishika)
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this vide explains the 3 main Writing Styles APA, Chicago, MLA. Citiations: Why Important? Formatting in research papers Standard acceptable method for citiation Avoids plagiarism Builds your credibility and shows that your ideas are shared by other scholars studying in the same field Provide all of the information so that reader can find the book/article cited Citations: Why Important? @0:33 Chicago (Turabian) @3:06 APA Style @6:11 MLA Style @9:28 Writing Style Differences @10:06 #Parenthetical #Criminal #Association #Appears #Footnotes #Superscripted #Credibility #Plagiarism #Citations #Manishika #Examrace Chicago (Turabian) Used since 1906 For all subject matter: historical journals, geography, sociology, anthropology & social sciences By University of Chicago Press Uses Footnotes – by Superscripted numerals Or Use In-Text Citations Use only page number on upper right, if heading appears on top then use page number at bottom Entire first and last name APA Style Origin: 1929 Social sciences: Business, criminal justice, economics, law Medical subjects: Nursing and psychology Create by American Psychological Association Uses only In-text citations Page number on upper right with title on left Only the initials of the first and middle name of each author Reduce bias in writing about gender, race, and other areas where discrimination is possible Year in Focus: If the research study citing is current and recent, or an arcane example of an "earlier theory" which has been debunked MLA Style 1st published by Modern Language Association of America in 1985. Used in humanities & literature Features brief parenthetical citations in the text keyed to an alphabetical list of works cited that appears at the end of the work (Smith 126) Writing Style Differences ACS (American Chemical Society) - Chemistry AIP (American Institute of Physics) - Physics ALWD (Association of Legal Writing Directors) - Legal Studies AMA (American Medical Association) - Medical Sciences AMS (American Mathematical Society) - Mathematics APSA (American Political Science Association) - Political Science, International Studies ASA (American Sociological Association) - Sociology AP (Associated Press) - Journalism, Public Relations Bluebook - Legal Studies CSE (Council of Science Editors) - Biology Harvard Business School - Business LSA (Linguistic Society of America) - Linguistics Maroonbook - Legal Studies NLM (National Library of Medicine) - Medicine Get complete postal course at http://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm For deatiled solutions to past paper questions visit: https://www.doorsteptutor.com/Exams/UGC/Paper-1/ Examrace is number 1 education portal for competitive and scholastic exam like UPSC, NET, SSC, Bank PO, IBPS, NEET, AIIMS, JEE and more. We provide free study material, exam & sample papers, information on deadlines, exam format etc. Our vision is to provide preparation resources to each and every student even in distant corners of the globe. Dr. Manishika Jain served as visiting professor at Gujarat University. Earlier she was serving in the Planning Department, City of Hillsboro, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA with focus on application of GIS for Downtown Development and Renewal. She completed her fellowship in Community-focused Urban Development from Colorado State University, Colorado, USA. For more information - https://www.examrace.com/About-Examrace/Company-Information/Examrace-Authors.html
Views: 57916 Examrace
CODE-SWITCHING: Jumping Between 2 Different Languages
 
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This video is all about the linguistic phenomenon called code-switching, switching between different languages while speaking. * Credit for the Hindi transliteration and English translation of the example sentence from "The 3 Idiots" goes to Reddit user Tactician_mark. Read his analysis of the entire scene here: https://goo.gl/vLvRSH Support Langfocus on Patreon http://patreon.com/langfocus My current Patrons include these fantastic people: Brandon Gonzalez, Felix Ravestein, Виктор Павлов, Guillermo Jimenez, Sidney Frattini Junior, Bennett Seacrist, Ruben Sanchez, Michael Cuomo, Eric Garland, Brian Michalowski, Sebastian Langshaw, Yixin Alfred Wang, Vadim Sobolev, Fred, UlasYesil, JL Bumgarner, Rob Hoskins, Thomas A. McCloud, Ian Smith, Maurice Chow, Matthew Cockburn, Raymond Thomas, Simon Blanchet, Ryan Marquardt, Sky Vied, Romain Paulus, Panot, Erik Edelmann, Bennet, James Zavaleta, Ulrike Baumann, Ian Martyn, Justin Faist, Jeff Miller, Stephen Lawson, Howard Stratton, George Greene, Panthea Madjidi, Nicholas Gentry, Sergios Tsakatikas, Bruno Filippi, Sergio Tsakatikas, Qarion, Pedro Flores, Raymond Thomas, Marco Antonio Barcellos Junior, David Beitler, Rick Gerritzen, Sailcat, Mark Kemp, Éric Martin, Leo Barudi, Piotr Chmielowski, Suzanne Jacobs, Johann Goergen, Darren Rennels, Caio Fernandes, Iddo Berger, Peter Nikitin, and Brent Werner for their generous Patreon support. *http://facebook.com/langfocus http://instagram.com/langfocus http://twitter.com/langfocus http://langfocus.com *Music* Rollin at 5 Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Outro music: "Ever Felt Pt. 1" by Otis McDonald.
Views: 214292 Langfocus
Does language shape how we think? Linguistic relativity & linguistic determinism -- Linguistics 101
 
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From the "Sapir-Whorf hypothesis" to modern psychology, get a quick feel for this ongoing debate. Is language about grammatical universals like nouns and verbs? What's the relationship between language and culture? Text version of this lesson with links to further resources: http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/linguistic-relativity.php To continue learning about language, subscribe to NativLang or visit: http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/ Music: Funkorama, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Views: 199270 NativLang
Sociolinguistics and Dialects
 
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What kinds of variation do we see in language? What does it mean for a linguistic system to be classified as a dialect or its very own capital-L Language? This week on the Ling Space, we talk about linguistic variation: the ways in which dialects can differ, what underlies different grammars, and why every version of a language is okay. This is Topic #11! This week's tag language: Greek! Find us on all the social media worlds: Tumblr: thelingspace.tumblr.com Twitter: @TheLingSpace Facebook: www.facebook.com/thelingspace/ And at our website, www.thelingspace.com! Our website also has extra content about this week's topic at www.thelingspace.com/episode-11/ We also have forums to discuss this episode, and linguistics more generally. Looking forward to next week!
Views: 52103 The Ling Space
Language Expert: Donald Trump's Way Of Speaking Is 'Oddly Adolescent' | The 11th Hour | MSNBC
 
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Columbia University professor of linguistics John McWhorter joins to discuss the unique way Donald Trump speaks which is unlike any president America's had before. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc About: MSNBC is the premier destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, MSNBC offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming -- 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Google+: http://on.msnbc.com/Plusmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Follow MSNBC on Tumblr: http://on.msnbc.com/LeanWithmsnbc Language Expert: Donald Trump's Way Of Speaking Is 'Oddly Adolescent' | The 11th Hour | MSNBC
Views: 6272584 MSNBC
Misconceptions about Linguistics
 
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Do you know what linguistics is and what linguists really do? In this video, I address five major misconceptions about linguistics. The discussion includes the fields or areas that linguists specialize in and where linguists work. [CC] English subtitles. [CC] Subtítulos en español. [CC] Legendado em português. ____________________ RELATED VIDEOS "About Literacy" playlist: https://goo.gl/t2DtAU "About Language and Linguistics" playlist: https://goo.gl/wXB6xh ____________________ FURTHER READING "The linguist vs polyglot gaffe" (web article): http://goo.gl/mVLxIO "Why linguists hate being asked how many languages they know." All Things Linguistics (blog): http://allthingslinguistic.com/post/48473292525/why-linguists-hate-being-asked-how-many-languages ____________________ REFERENCES "Current LINGUIST Subfiends." The Linguist List (web page): http://www.linguistlist.org/LL/LingSubfields.cfm "What is Linguistics?" Linguistics (University of California, Santa Cruz web page): http://linguistics.ucsc.edu/about/what-is-linguistics.html "Why Major in Linguistics?" Monica Macaulay and Kristen Syrett. (Lingistic Society of America web page): http://www.linguisticsociety.org/content/why-major-linguistics ____________________ MUSIC "And Then We Take Them Down Again" by DoKashiteru (feat. Susan Joseph) "Sooner or Later" in Artificial Music by Aryll Fae
Views: 36499 Snap Language
Top Ten Most Effective Martial Arts
 
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In this video I share my personal opinion on the top ten martial arts in order of effectiveness. NOTE: When I say "traditional" karate, I actually ment "Sport" karate, I apologise for this linguistic imprecision. I have practiced two styles of Karate (Shotokan, Kyokushin), Taekwondo, and Wushu Kun Fu, so although I'm not an expert I do have first hand experience of martial arts and the martial world. Ofcourse I do realise there are many factors to keep into consideration and martial arts like Karate and Kung Fu have many different styles which have variations, but in this video we want to have an interesting opportunity to share out opinions as martial arts lovers. Thank you for watching Check out my "top ten most effective weapon based martial arts" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNNpBqiCX4E Please consider supporting me on Patreon if you like my work on youtube :D Follow me on my social networks: https://www.patreon.com/themetatron https://www.instagram.com/metatron_youtube/ https://www.facebook.com/Metatron-1538668943017953/?fref=ts https://twitter.com/pureMetatron http://realmetatron.tumblr.com/ Music: intro ES_Knights Templar 1 - Johannes Bornlöf outro ES_Knights Templar 2 - Johannes Bornlöf
Views: 4507812 Metatron
Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain
 
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Steven Pinker - Psychologist, Cognitive Scientist, and Linguist at Harvard University How did humans acquire language? In this lecture, best-selling author Steven Pinker introduces you to linguistics, the evolution of spoken language, and the debate over the existence of an innate universal grammar. He also explores why language is such a fundamental part of social relationships, human biology, and human evolution. Finally, Pinker touches on the wide variety of applications for linguistics, from improving how we teach reading and writing to how we interpret law, politics, and literature. The Floating University Originally released September, 2011. Additional Lectures: Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NbBjNiw4tk Joel Cohen: Joel Cohen: An Introduction to Demography (Malthus Miffed: Are People the Problem?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vr44C_G0-o
Views: 1177245 Big Think
What is COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS? What does COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS mean?
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS? What does COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS mean? COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS meaning - COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS definition - COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Computational linguistics is an interdisciplinary field concerned with the statistical or rule-based modeling of natural language from a computational perspective. Traditionally, computational linguistics was usually performed by computer scientists who had specialized in the application of computers to the processing of a natural language. Computational linguists often work as members of interdisciplinary teams, including linguists (specifically trained in linguistics), language experts (persons with some level of ability in the languages relevant to a given project), and computer scientists. In general, computational linguistics draws upon the involvement of linguists, computer scientists, experts in artificial intelligence, mathematicians, logicians, philosophers, cognitive scientists, cognitive psychologists, psycholinguists, anthropologists and neuroscientists, among others. Computational linguistics has theoretical and applied components, where theoretical computational linguistics takes up issues in theoretical linguistics and cognitive science, and applied computational linguistics focuses on the practical outcome of modeling human language use.
Views: 10326 The Audiopedia
v2 - What Is Linguistics?
 
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1. My t-shirt is from the Centro Cultural Tijuana (CECUT): http://www.cecut.gob.mx/ 2a. On my use of #scientific | #humanistic | #philosophical: I've recently decided that calling linguistics the "_scientific_ study of language" does a huge disservice to the field and enforces a particular way of thinking about inquiry that I no longer support. Linguistics is the _objective_ study of langauge, but that allows many approaches besides the scientific one. 2b. On my use of #form | #meaning | #use: My entire approach to linguistic inquiry circles around this FORM-MEANING-USE trifecta: the form of linguistic elements, the meaning behind linguistic elements, and the use of those elements in context. I don't think we can separate the three -- in fact, I think it's theoretically pernicious to do so -- and I think that any theory that requires the ignorance of one or more of these aspects is doomed to remain in the dark about the true nature of language. For more on linguistic competence and an alternative way of doing linguistic methodology (one that doesn't focus on #use, really): Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a Window to Understanding the Brain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-B_ONJIEcE 3. Brain woodcut in the "Systematic" graphic is by Juan Valverde de Amusco. 4. On competence vs Performance: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_competence 5. On langue and parole: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langue_and_parole 6. Why can't we just ask people what they know about their language? (see comment below) 7. Deduce! Images from Star Trek: The Next Generation, "Elementary, Dear Data". Probably copyright Paramount. 8. For more descriptive vs. prescriptive hijinks: Tom Scott: There's Nothing Wrong with Saying "10 Items or Less": Descriptivism vs. Prescriptivism http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qT8ZYewYEY Language Log: Everything Is Correct vs Nothing Is Relevant, by Geoffrey K. Pullum. http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001843.html Matthew Rogers: Stephen Fry Kinetic Typography -- Language https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7E-aoXLZGY 9. More on double negatives and non-standard grammar: Double negatives, also called Negative Concord in linguistics, are everywhere. If you're an English speaker, negative concord is very likely the default that you acquire with English and only later learn to avoid as a prescriptive rule. Here's a nice map from Yale of who uses Negative Concord: http://microsyntax.sites.yale.edu/negative-concord 10. "Because I'm a Linguist" from _Life After PhD_ at: http://lifeafterphdcomics.blogspot.com/ "Literally pissed myself" from _The Oatmeal_ at: http://theoatmeal.com/comics/literally 11. "Period Speech" from _xkcd_ at: http://xkcd.com/771/ 12. On the use of * in linguistics: Most of the time, linguists use * to indicate that the following thing is ungrammatical, or not well-formed, as in: *lfez — which violates the rules of English phonology — or *Donut Jon the ate. — which violates the rules of English syntax. 13. Sociolinguistic Competence (Communicative Competence): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communicative_competence 14. Biscuits & Groovy (http://www.iwantbiscuits.com/) is amazing. 15. Language Teaching "Pizza": http://beingmultilingual.blogspot.com/2011/09/teaching-languages-vs-teaching-learners.html 16. ASHA logo is presumably copyright: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, www.asha.org 17. For more on Forensic Linguistics: The International Association of Forensic Linguists, www.iafl.org? Forensic text analysis image from: The case for forensic linguistics. by Elizabeth Mitchell. 2008. BBC News. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7600769.stm 18. Analysis of the sexist ketchup ad from: http://chomskywhatalad.blogspot.com/2012/07/gender-and-advertising.html 19. Linguist Llama is amazing. http://lingllama.tumblr.com/ 20. "My Fair Lady" images are presumably copyright Warner Bros. 21. Zork screenshot from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zork ZOMG! You can play Zork online! For free! http://thcnet.net/zork/ 22. Go a-linguisting! Here's how you do it: a. Go somewhere where people are talking. b. Listen to what people are saying around you... write it down as perfectly as you can. (Don't record it, though... that's an invasion of privacy. Hear that, NSA? RECORDING PEOPLE WITHOUT PERMISSION IS AN INVASION.) c. Go home and look at your transcript. Highlight the things that look interesting to you. Are they performance errors or dialectal variation? d. Repeat as necessary — linguistics is awesome!
Views: 29429 DS Bigham
What Happens When Maths Goes Wrong? - with Matt Parker
 
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Most of the time, the maths in our everyday lives works quietly behind the scenes, until someone forgets to carry a '1' and a bridge collapses or a plane drops out of the sky. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Matt Parker is a stand-up comedian and mathematician. He appears regularly on TV and online: as well as being a presenter on the Discovery Channel. His YouTube videos have been viewed over 37 million times. Previously a high-school mathrmatics teacher, Matt visits schools to talk to students about maths as part of Think Maths and he is involved in the Maths Inspiration shows. In his remaining free time, Matt wrote the books Things To Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension and Humble Pi: A Comedy of Maths Errors. He is also the Public Engagement in Mathematics Fellow at Queen Mary University of London. Find where to purchase Matt's new book, Humble Pi: http://wwwh.umble-pi.com This talk was filmed in the Ri on 1 March 2019. --- A very special thank you to our Patreon supporters who help make these videos happen, especially: bestape, Dave Ostler, David Lindo, Greg Nagel, Ivan Korolev, John Pollock, Lester Su, Osian Gwyn Williams, Radu Tizu, Rebecca Pan, Robert Hillier, Roger Baker, Sergei Solovev, and Will Knott --- The Ri is on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheRoyalInstitution and Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 552511 The Royal Institution
Bilingualism
 
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What happens when babies are exposed to more than one language at the same time? You might be worried about them getting confused, but The Ling Space is here this week to talk about bilingualism, and how kids have no trouble working out how to build their two languages right. It turns out babies, as always, are linguistically amazing. This is Topic #6! This week's tag language: Hebrew! Find us on all the social media worlds: Tumblr: thelingspace.tumblr.com Twitter: @TheLingSpace Facebook: www.facebook.com/thelingspace/ And at our website, www.thelingspace.com! Our website also has extra content about this week's topic at www.thelingspace.com/episode-6/ We also have forums to discuss this episode, and linguistics more generally! Looking forward to next week!
Views: 27626 The Ling Space
Discover Your Learning Style and Optimize Your Self Study
 
06:20
Take the learning style quiz and write your results in the comments: http://vark-learn.com/the-vark-questionnaire/ Knowing your individual learning style and your preferred learning modalities is very useful in helping you direct and focus your own language learning, particularly self study. Are you a visual learner? An auditory learner? A read-write learner? A kinesthetic learner? A multimodal learner? How can you use that knowledge to help you learn better? Support Langfocus on Patreon: http://patreon.com/langfocus http://facebook.com/langfocus http://instagram.com/langfocus http://twitter.com/langfocus http://langfocus.com Music: "Mo Blues" by Passion The HiFi. Outro music: "Otis McMusic" by Otis McDonald.
Views: 60201 Langfocus
What is language? - Defining "language" vs. "languages" -- Linguistics 101
 
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So what's this thing we call language? And what are individual languages? And, of all the many things we do, is it the one thing that makes us human? Kids in Kenya and China don't grow up to speak each others' languages, but they both have the ability to use language. Let's take a moment to think about what we mean when we say the words "language" and "languages". When two people are chattering away in a foreign language, how do we know they're still using language? Is language inherited (innate) or learned (nurtured)? Do our lofty conversations fit well with things like body language and animal communication? How does language relate to the other kinds of thinking we do? Subscribe to continue learning about language. Text versions are available too: http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/ Music: Time Passing By, Audionautix.com Worriless, nativlang Epic Quest, nativlang
Views: 72589 NativLang
How Donald Trump Answers A Question
 
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HELP ME MAKE MORE VIDEOS: http://www.patreon.com/nerdwriter VISIT WISECRACK HERE: http://bit.ly/1xPTaB7 TUMBLR: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: [email protected] SOURCES: Barton Swaim, “How Donald Trump’s language works for him” (via The Washington Post) September 15, 2015 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2015/09/15/how-trump-speak-has-pushed-the-donald-into-first-place/ Emily Atkin, “What Language Experts Find So Strange About Donald Trump” (via ThinkProgress) 2015 http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2015/09/15/3701215/donald-trump-talks-funny-2/ Matt Viser, “For presidential hopefuls, simpler language resonates” (via The Boston Globe) October 20, 2015 https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/politics/2015/10/20/donald-trump-and-ben-carson-speak-grade-school-level-that-today-voters-can-quickly-grasp/LUCBY6uwQAxiLvvXbVTSUN/story.html Jack Shafer, “Donald Trump Talks Like a Third-Grader” (via Politico) 2015 http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/08/donald-trump-talks-like-a-third-grader-121340 ALL THE MUSIC COMES FROM HERE: https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday
Views: 8664727 Nerdwriter1
Hilarious examples of awful language usage - Steven Pinker
 
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Excerpted from his lecture at the Royal Institution: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV5J6BfToSw Steven Pinker is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. He conducts research on language and cognition and has authored ten books, including: The Language Instinct How the Mind Works The Blank Slate The Stuff of Thought The Better Angels of Our Nature and most recently, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century. http://stevenpinker.com
Views: 850980 Gravitahn
Mastering Style: The Learning and Teaching of Writing
 
01:15:52
The Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT), in collaboration with the Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series, welcomed Professor Steven Pinker and Visiting Professor Jill Abramson on December 9th, 2014 in a talk at Harvard titled, "Mastering Style: The Learning and Teaching of Writing." The discussion, inspired by the recent publication of Professor Pinker’s book, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century, was focused on the teaching and learning of writing, associated challenges, and practical recommendations. The starting point of effective writing, Pinker shared, is for the author to determine a mental model of the communication scenario between the writer and the reader. Pinker shared the “classic style” theory of interpreting writer/reader communication from literary scholars Francis-Noel Thomas and Mark Turner. Classic style aims to help the reader see objective reality, which can be accomplished by focusing on the thing being shown and not on the activity of studying it, as well as by avoiding clichés and “metaconcepts” (concepts about concepts), among other recommendations. Academic writing, in contrast, is frequently written in postmodern or self-conscious style, one that includes apologizing and hedging.
Views: 41370 Harvard University
What Shakespeare's English Sounded Like - and how we know
 
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Botched rhymes, buried puns and a staged accent that sounds more Victorian than Elizabethan. No more! Use linguistic sleuthing to dig up the surprisingly different sound of the bard's Early Modern English. Subscribe for language: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=NativLang Be my patron: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=584038 ~ Briefly, and without spoilers ~ I'm embarrassed to admit that this is the first time I ever really got into Shakespeare. There's a personal story here, which I'll quickly share in the video. The idea of reconstructing his pronunciation intrigued me. As I started making trips to the library and downloading old grammars, I just found the questions piling on. I did find some answers for you. It starts with his odd spelling - well, the spelling he inherited. Chaucer's medieval spelling was followed by modern sound changes, including the start of the Great Vowel Shift. The introduction of Caxton's printing press and the spelling debates put Early Modern English in a state of flux by Shakespeare's time. They also left our first trail of evidence. Other evidence comes from rhythm, rhymes and - more reluctantly - puns. Many of these don't work the same way anymore, from the rhymes like "sea" and "prey" to the rhythm of "housewifery". Modern dialects add another layer of evidence, at times preserving features that standard English accents, notably RP, have lost. The sound of his language is also shaped by his grammar. His use of "thou" and his third-person "-th" vs "-s" verb endings always stand out to English speakers. Finally, though data-crunchers challenge his legendary status as king of all the words, we consider how innovative he was in the way he used words. We end with a note on linguist David Crystal's Original Pronunciation ("OP") experiment at the reconstructed Globe Theatre, and some thoughts on what studying Shakespeare's sounds as a different pronunciation system says about him and about us. ~ Credits ~ Narration, art and animation by Josh from NativLang. Some of the music, too. Sources for claims and for imgs, sfx, fonts and music: https://docs.google.com/document/d/183wkdASSh4RfY52I5hdPOB3-v2gquXwlpd8EyINZHSE/
Views: 1952772 NativLang
The Linguistics of AAVE
 
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It's about time I address linguistic prescriptivism. Links to things I didn't make that are in this video: Intro song: "Flight of the Breezies" by Kadenza https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWXvSBHB210 Outro song: "Mach Speed" by FlightRush https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BW63OOPu7Q Map of race in Chicago by Bill Rankin http://www.radicalcartography.net/index.html?chicagodots A cool video he made about it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pRcdMVkA3k Map of dialects of North American English: http://aschmann.net/AmEng/ Photo of Los Angeles by Nserrano: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles#/media/File:LA_Skyline_Mountains2.jpg Photo of New York by Anthony Quintano: https://www.flickr.com/photos/quintanomedia/14825199293 Photo of Chicago by J. Crocker: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2010-02-19_16500x2000_chicago_skyline_panorama.jpg Photo of a swamp in Mississippi by Gary Bridgman: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mississippi#/media/File:Wolf-River-swamp-North-Mississippi.jpg Anonymous painting of slaves on a South-Carolina plantation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United_States#/media/File:Slave_dance_to_banjo,_1780s.jpg Picture of a slave ship: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunny_South_(clipper)#/media/File:HMS_Brisk_and_Emanuela.jpg Screen shots of websites used were from here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Nigeria http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bidialectalism
Views: 989004 Xidnaf
What Is Style?
 
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We asked a few cool guys 'n girls the question, "What does Style mean to you?" Some of the answers were surprising! What do you think?
Views: 689 Dear Velvet
The Portuguese Language and What Makes it Intriguing
 
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This is a documentary style language profile about the Portuguese language which is spoken in Portugal, Brazil, and beyond. *** Explanation of the introduction: I say (in Spanish) "Really? I speak Spanish!" *** At 3:07 the map of Mozambique is upside down. Sorry for the mistake! No offense was intended. Support Langfocus on Patreon: http://patreon.com/langfocus http://facebook.com/langfocus http://twitter.com/langfocus http://instagram.com/langfocus http://langfocus.com Music: Artifact - The Dark Contenent by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Artist: http://incompetech.com/ "Fortaleza" by Topher Mohr and Alex Elena. "Mumbai Effect" by Jingle Punks. Outro music: "Circular" by Gunnar Olsen.
Views: 1767388 Langfocus
Michael Halliday - Language evolving: Some systemic functional reflections on the history of meaning
 
01:07:55
Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, and hosted by the Department of Language and Literacy Education and the Faculty of Education as part of the plenary session at the 37th International Systemic Functional Congress, Halliday poses the evolution of language seems a simple enough concept: it arose in the work of scholars studying the history of linguistic forms (phonology, morphology, some syntax). But a language is a semiotic system; more importantly a semogenic, or meaning-creating, system; and meaning also has a history - a highly complex one. Every language has, in Sapir's term, a "certain cut", its own (constantly evolving) ways of meaning; yet most of its features are shared with other languages. We seek out the history of meaning along various routes: in the history of the form of language, in the history of the people that speak it, in the history of the locale where it is spoken, and in the history of its varied cultural contexts. Consider English and Chinese, as two widely spoken and widely-documented languages. The history of meaning in English includes changes that took place in ancient Greek and in ancient and medieval Latin, even though English is not "descended from" these languages; Chinese has undergone somewhat less upheaval, but the history of Mandarin involved contact with ways of meaning derived from Sanskrit and from Mongolian, both also "unrelated" to Chinese. I think that, to study the history of meaning, we take account of both child language development and the emergence of learned forms of discourse; we maintain a trinocular perspective; and we seek systemic and functional (especially metafunctional) explanations of semiotic patterns in discourse.
What is a Linguist? || Lindsay Does Languages Video
 
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What is a linguist? A person who loves to study foreign languages or a person who studies linguistics? Or both? What do you think? Share in the comments! Cool stuff below.... Buy 1 get 1 free on italki lessons by signing up via this link: http://promos.italki.com/lindsay-does-languages/ Claim your free ebook Finding Time in Your Life for Language Learning: http://bit.ly/LDLfree-ebook-findtime Do you want language lessons? I can teach you: http://bit.ly/learnwithLDL Looking to work with me? Let's talk: http://bit.ly/workwithLDL Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/LDL-youtube-sub Social Media: Blog: http://bit.ly/LDL-blog Facebook: http://bit.ly/LDL-facebook Twitter: http://bit.ly/LDL-twitter Pinterest: http://bit.ly/LDL-pinterest Instagram: http://bit.ly/LDL-instagram Tumblr: http://bit.ly/LDL-tumblr Google+: http://bit.ly/LDL-gplus Music: Via Nicolai Heidlas: https://soundcloud.com/nicolai-heidlas/delighting-memories-upbeat-ukulele-background-music Sponsorship: This video is sponsored by italki: http://promos.italki.com/lindsay-does-languages/ Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QW6q/
Views: 14660 Lindsay Williams
8 Intelligences - Theory of Multiple Intelligences Explained - Dr. Howard Gardner
 
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In his theory of multiple intelligences, Dr. Howard Gardner describes how humans can be intellectually smart in a variety of different ways. There are: Logical-mathematical Verbal linguistic Interpersonal, Body-Kinesthetic Musical Visual-Spatial Intrapersonal Naturalistic In my next video, I will teach you how to improve each one of these types of intelligences to become a more efficient, smarter human being. In this animation and visual summary, I teach you the basics of each leg in Gardner's theory and what kind of people are great at each. Check out MY Passive Income Ebook: http://bit.ly/PsychologyIncome
Views: 393164 Practical Psychology
The linguistic genius of babies | Patricia Kuhl
 
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http://www.ted.com At TEDxRainier, Patricia Kuhl shares astonishing findings about how babies learn one language over another -- by listening to the humans around them and "taking statistics" on the sounds they need to know. Clever lab experiments (and brain scans) show how 6-month-old babies use sophisticated reasoning to understand their world.
Views: 428466 TED
What could you do with a Linguistics degree? | Experience Your Field
 
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Fourth year Glendon Linguistics and Language Studies student Kirsty shares her experience volunteering in the field of speech language pathology. More on the Linguistics and Language Studies program at Glendon: http://www.glendon.yorku.ca/lin/ CONNECT WITH GLENDON Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlendonCampus Twitter: https://twitter.com/glendoncampus Instagram: http://instagram.com/glendoncampus Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com
Views: 24976 Glendon Campus
Why study Applied Linguistics?
 
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This session introduces students to the content of the Applied Linguistics pathway. With Laura Paterson and Maria Leedham
Views: 7087 The Student Hub Live
WHAT IS LINGUISTICS? | Nico de Gallo
 
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Hey, everybody! Here's the first episode (content-wise) of Nico de Gallo! I know it's a day late, but it's also my birthday, so I don't care! :D EDIT: For those of you that can't follow what I'm saying, there ARE annotations, but they don't show up on phones/touchpads for some reason. :( Music: "Untitled" by Thaelo https://soundcloud.com/thaeloraps
Views: 520 Nico de Gallo
GEN102 - 5 Reasons for Linguistics with David Crystal
 
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Why shall we bother about linguistics? What are the main reasons for doing linguistics? In an interview recorded at Marburg university during the 2nd GAL Conference, Prof. Handke asked Prof. David Crystal, the most popular linguist in the world, to give us his 5 central reasons for doing linguistics.